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Real Madrid vs. Barcelona is the $1 billion game everyone has been waiting for

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7 hours ago

Some European banks need more capital.

  Around 25 banks in Europe have failed the European Central Bank’s latest stress tests, the results of which will be announced officially on Sunday. Though it’s not all bad news as 105 have passed, Bloomberg reported. Some of the 25 that failed are Italian and Greek banks, though none are said to be French or German.
October 24, 2014

Roku is planning its IPO.

  Sources at The Wall Street Journal don’t know exactly when it’ll happen, but it’ll happen (paywall). The television and TV peripherals company—which last month said it sold more than 10 million units of its set-top boxes—is said to be looking to raise $150 million.
October 24, 2014

School shooting in Washington state hospitalizes three.

  Law enforcement officials tell the Seattle Times that a male gunman opened fire inside the Marysville-Pilchuck High School cafeteria, shooting four people in the head. Three are in critical condition and undergoing surgery. One is dead. The shooter is also dead in a reported suicide.
October 23, 2014

Ebola takes a life in Mali—its first case.

  A two-year-old Malian girl who traveled to Guinea has died from the virus, making Mali now the sixth West African country to record a recent case. Senegal and Nigeria have since been declared Ebola-free.
October 24, 2014

Putin acknowledges he helped a friend.

  When former Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych knew he was about to be overthrown, he called the Kremlin. Now for the first time, Vladimir Putin has publicly admitted to assisting him. “He asked to be driven away to Russia, which we did,” said the Russian president.
October 23, 2014
Chart of the Moment

The end of cable TV is (sort of) nigh.

October 24, 2014

Procter & Gamble is dumping Duracell.

  The consumer goods giant plans to split off the battery brand, one of the world’s largest by market share. It’s likely the biggest part of a plan to shed as many as 100 sluggish product lines, slim down the company, and focus on businesses with growth potential.
October 24, 2014

A computer scientist sets the record for high-altitude skydiving.

  Remember when 45-year-old Felix Baumgartner jumped out of a stratospheric balloon back in 2012? He did that from an altitude of 128,100 ft., setting a world record. Alan Eustace—a 57-year-old computer scientist at Google—just broke that record, jumping from a height of 135,908 ft. “It was amazing,” he said.

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