TERRIFYING BEAUTY

The year’s best photos of the world’s rarest weather phenomena

Climate change has created a new niche in photography. The Royal Photographic Society and Royal Meteorological Society in the UK announced the very first Weather Photographer of the Year awards on Sept. 10, and released dramatic images of rare weather phenomena.

In over 800 submissions of supercell thunderstorms, Arctic diamond dust, and polar stratospheric clouds, the jury of photographers, editors, and a BBC weatherman has picked out the best to show us the serene beauty and power of mother earth.

Polar stratospheric clouds that could destroy the ozone, taken with a compact digital camera. (Royal Photographic Society/Alan Tough)
Ice sculpture in Wales, UK. (Royal Photographic Society/Allan Macdougall)
Two clashing storm cells in New Mexico, US. (Royal Photographic Society/Camelia Czuchnicki)
Misty river at dawn, in Somerset, UK. (Royal Photographic Society/Kevin Pearson)
Storm clouds in the Midlands, near York, UK. (Royal Photographic Society/
First snow with rainbow taken in Sheffield, UK. (Royal Photographic Society/Mat Robinson)
22° and 46° Sun Halos, Sun Dogs, Parhelic Circle, Upper Tangent Arc and Circum Zenithal Arc visible over Halley Research Station, Antarctica.<br />(Royal Photographic Society/Michal Krzysztofowicz)
Waves engulfing Whitehaven harbor in Cumbria, UK.<br />(Royal Photographic Society/Paul Kingston)
Supercell storm chase in Nebraska, US. (Royal Photographic Society/Stephen Lansdell)
Hills shrouded in closes in Carneddau, North Wales, UK. (Royal Photographic Society/Steve M. Smith)
Freezing fog and hoar frost taken in Suffolk, UK. (Royal Photographic Society/Andrew Bailey)
Hailstorm and rainbow in Suffolk, UK. (Royal Photographic Society/James bailey)
Frosty morning in North Yorkshire, UK.<br />(Royal Photographic Society/Paula Davies)
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