A wayback machine on Hillary Clinton’s website compares what she and Donald Trump have been up to, by year


Donald Trump’s presidential campaign is struggling, and Hillary Clinton is milking it.

The Democratic candidate is no tech whiz, but her campaign has come up with a clever way to assert what it sees as the essential difference between her and her Republican opponent: She spent her career fighting for women and families, while he used his energies bankrupting companies, swindling small business owners, and advocating for smaller bikinis in a beauty pageant.

The Clinton campaign has launched a tool which spans five decades, juxtaposing Clinton’s actions (described in glowing terms, of course) with Trump’s (roundly derided). The “way back when” feature juxtaposes selected moments such as Clinton working with the Children’s Defense Fund in 1973—the year the Justice Department sued Trump for refusing to rent apartment units “because of race and color.” In 1979, Clinton was the chair of the Rural Health Advisory Committee, while Trump avoided paying federal income tax that year.

Of course, the facts and moments selected have been cherry-picked to make Trump look bad—but when you have a candidate who brags about not paying taxes, underpays workers and calls pregnancy an “inconvenience,” the side-by-side comparison with Clinton’s career of advocacy, politics, and support for her husband’s political career is striking.

Here are some examples:

1995. (Hillary Clinton Campaign)
1997. (Hillary Clinton Campaign)
2002. (Hillary Clinton Campaign)
2009. (Hillary Clinton Campaign)
2012. (Hillary Clinton Campaign)

Clinton’s first experiment with online media of this sort was a Facebook app, “Trump Yourself,” which let people add some of the most outrageous Donald Trump quotes to their photos, ridiculing his stance on everything from same-sex marriage to illegal immigrants. Her well-designed app also took digs at her opponent with a “Trump or False” game, where people had to pick whether or not Trump said a certain quote. Many of the “false” ones were drawn from dictators around the world, illustrating their similarity to Trump’s rhetoric.

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