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Reuters/Scott Morgan
When paper glasses just wont do.
STARING AT THE SUN

What Americans—and one very responsible dog—looked like staring at the solar eclipse

Johnny Simon
By Johnny Simon

Contributor

As the great solar eclipse of 2017 moved across the United States yesterday, crowds congregated below to watch it happen. Some pilgrimaged inland to gather under the “path of totality,” where the sun would appear totally eclipsed. Meanwhile, in large cities like New York, Washington and Los Angeles, people in office buildings and on the street stopped in their tracks to catch a glimpse of a partially obscured sun.

While many tried to capture the perfect solar corona on phones and cameras, those images only tell half of the story. The rest of the once-in-a-lifetime spectacle can be seen on their faces, each turned skyward to see something amazing.

Reuters/Brendan McDermid
People watch the solar eclipse from the observation deck of The Empire State Building in New York City.
Reuters/Brendan McDermid
Juventino Luna (R) and his son Jesus Luna watch the solar eclipse on the lawn of Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles.
Reuters/Mario Anzuoni
People watch the solar eclipse on the lawn of Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles.
Reuters/Scott Morgan
Rafi Davis, 7, of Sliver Springs, Maryland, watches the solar eclipse at Carhenge in Alliance, Neb.
Reuters/Mike Blake
People use solar viewing glasses as the sun emerges through fog cover in Depoe Bay, Oregon.
AP Photo/Alan Diaz
Belen Jesuit Preparatory School student Daniel Jimenez looks through solar glasses as he watches the eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Miami. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)
AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana
People gather to watch phases of solar eclipse on the National Mall in Washington
Reuters/Mike Blake
People watch the Solar Eclipse in Depoe Bay, Oregon.
Reuters/Bryan Snyder
Seventeen year-old Audrey Franklin (R) and her twelve year-old brother Wally, who traveled from Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, watch the solar eclipse at the football stadium at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois.
Reuters/Adrees Latif
An enthusiast holds his dog Prince, who sports solar glasses, as they await a total solar eclipse from atop Carroll Rim Trail at Painted Hills, near Mitchell, Oregon.
Reuters/Rick Wilking
People look at the 360-degree twilight during the total solar eclipse in Guernsey, Wyoming.
Reuters/Bryan Snyder
Viewers react to the total eclipse in the football stadium at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois.
AP Photo/Nati Harnik
The sun peeks through the clouds as people wearing solar glasses watch in Falls City, Neb.
AP Photo/Morry Gash
Priti Khandheria, right, and Zeest Tajik in Milwaukee.
AP Photo/Darron Cummings
Henry Boritt in Indianapolis.
AP Photo/Richard Vogel
A crowd gathers in front of the Hollywood sign at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles
Reuters/Randall Hill
U.S. Navy sailors Soloman Rucker (Front) and Peyton Warner check the position of the sun on the flight deck of the Naval museum ship U.S.S. Yorktown in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.
Reuters/Jonathan Ernst
A man vapes as he watches the solar eclipse from Clingmans Dome, in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee.
Reuters/Shannon Stapleton
Women view the solar eclipse through glasses and an iPhone at Times Square in Manhattan, New York, U.S., August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 40.7589° N, 73.9851° W. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton – RTS1CPPD
Reuters/Scott Morgan
Laura Witte of Ft. Collins, Colo., watches the solar eclipse at Carhenge in Alliance, Neb.
AP Photo/David Zalubowski
Happy Haynes of Denver uses glasses as she joins others residents as they gather at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science.
Reuters/Jonathan Ernst
People watch the total solar eclipse from Clingmans Dome the highest point in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee.
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