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REBUILDING

A lonely aerial view of Irma’s destruction in the Florida Keys

Matt McClain/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)AP Photo/Chris O'Meara
Damaged houses in the Florida Keys on Monday, Sept. 11.
  • Johnny Simon
By Johnny Simon

Deputy Photo Editor

This article is more than 2 years old.

Hurricane Irma started its path in the continental United States with the Florida Keys, a quiet archipelago connected by a single highway.

Although Irma struck on Sept 10, some Keys residents still cannot return to their homes. FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, estimates that a quarter of homes in these islands were destroyed, according to the Associated Press. Multiple islands remain off-limits to residents. Below, new aerial photos released by Reuters and the AP reveal the damage left behind, and suggest the long process of rebuilding that awaits the storm’s victims.

AP Photo/Chris O'Meara
Debris at a dock in Key West, Fla. on Sept. 12
AP Photo/Chris O'Meara
A damaged home sits in Key West, Fla. on Sept. 12.
AP Photo/Chris O'Meara
A sailboat is pushed up between two buildings in Key West on Sept. 12
AP Photo/Chris O'Meara
Debris from Hurricane Irma is pushed up against a sea wall in Key West, Fla. on Sept 12.
Reuters/Carlo Allegri
A destroyed trailer park in Marathon, Fla. on Sept. 13.
Reuters/Carlo Allegri
Boats are pictured washed ashore in Marathon, Fla.
Reuters/Carlo Allegri
A bridge with boats washed up under it in Marathon, Fla.
A destroyed trailer park in Marathon, Fla.
Reuters/Carlo Allegri
A sunken boat off the cost of Marathon, Fla.
Reuters/Carlo Allegri
A destroyed marina in Marathon Fla.

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