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Rescue workers and volunteers search a building that collapsed during Mexico earthquake
AP Photo/Miguel Tovar
Give Mexico a hand.
DIGGING MEXICO OUT

How to help Mexico recover from its devastating earthquake from wherever you are

By Ana Campoy

Mexico is still digging through the rubble of a powerful earthquake that struck its capital city and neighboring states on Sept. 19.

The death toll had surpassed 200 people by Wednesday morning, and is expected to keep climbing. Relief efforts are focused on treating victims and rescuing (link in Spanish) people who are still trapped under fallen buildings. Here’s how you can help:

Red Cross

The Mexican Red Cross’s experts have been combing through debris, ferrying the injured out of harm’s way, and treating them. The group’s president told local media (Spanish) that they need donations to buy medical supplies.

You can donate to the group through different channels: their own site (Spanish), Paypal (Spanish, but you can switch to English on the pay page,) and Amazon (Spanish.)

Los Topos

The Rescue Brigade Topos Tlaltelolco is a professional rescue team assembled in the wake of Mexico City’s deadliest earthquake in 1985. The group, whose nickname means “moles,” is at the front lines (Spanish) of this week’s rescue efforts. Los Topos are accepting donations via their bank account and Paypal.

Google

The search engine, which partners with the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, a group that channels donations to local groups for disaster relief, has set up a page to collect funds for Mexico’s affected areas.

Structural expertise

The vast majority of buildings in the affected areas are still standing, but many likely suffered enough damage to render them unsafe. Some people are uploading pictures of their homes to social networks, in order to get advice about whether they’re safe enough to enter. Engineers and architects can help survivors gauge structural integrity by responding (link in Spanish) to the online hashtag #revisamigrieta.

Local help

For those in the affected areas, or in other Mexican states, here’s a list (Spanish) of donation drop-off centers and places to volunteer.