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11-year-old Harnitha's "Beast Racer 210" features wings for hover flight mode, functions on both land and water, and glows in the dark.
Harnitha/GoCompare
11-year-old Harnitha’s “Beast Racer 210” features wings for hover flight mode, functions on both land and water, and glows in the dark.
DREAM CAR

The futuristic, alternative-energy cars that kids think we should be driving

By Karen Hao

As the automotive industry continues its relentless push toward self-driving and flying cars, it seems appropriate to ask future drivers what exactly they’re looking for.

Recently, GoCompare, a comparison shopping website that offers car insurance rates, asked ten children, ages 6 through 12, to sketch their sweet next-generation rides. The results aren’t just hilariously charming demonstrations of children’s imaginations run wild. They also speak to our evolving attitudes and aspirations for the future of transportation.

Many of the children, for example, included alternative fuel sources in their designs. Eleven-year-old Paula’s hover car is powered by the solar panel on its roof, whereas 11-year-old Joel’s “Mega Alset” runs on hydroelectric power.

This two-floor hover car is powered by the solar panel on its roof. As roads will be magnetic in the future, the bottom of the car is also magnetic and it's these opposing energies which allow the car to hover.
Paula/GoCompare
Paula, 11 | This two-floor hover car is powered by the solar panel on its roof and uses a magnetic bottom to oppose the magnetic roads of the future.

Eleven-year-old Kyre’s “Hennessy K Cell GT” includes a generator that holds 11,000 volts of electricity and connects to the car’s two back wheels, which generate more electricity when the car is moving.

The Hennessy K Cell GT runs on a generator which holds 11,000 volts of electricity. The two back wheels are connected to the electric generator and are thus able to generate more electricity. All four wheels can be tucked in and the alloys turn into helicopter propellers enabling the car to fly. Its front lights enable visibility up to 100 metres.
Kyre/GoCompare
Kyre, 11 | The Hennessy K Cell GT runs on a generator that holds 11,000 volts of electricity and connects to the two back wheels to generate more electricity. All four wheels convert into helicopter propellers. The car’s front lights enable visibility up to 100 meters.

In contrast, six-year-old Isla imagines a car fueled by chocolate that can also get a boost of speed from shooting cupcakes out of its tailpipe.

The Candy Robo car features rear windows with an x-ray view and the car is fuelled by chocolate. There's also a chocolate and cupcake booster feature. The car is driven via the pod on the top which is surrounded by a garden. The robot head is the steering wheel and you can choose to drive on whichever side of the car you wish. There is also a robot assistant on the roof to help you.
Isla/GoCompare
Isla, 6 | The chocolate-fueled Candy Robo car features rear windows with an x-ray view and a cupcake booster. The car is driven via the pod on the top which uses a robot head as the steering wheel.

Many of the designs also had flying or swimming capabilities. The wheels on the Hennessy K Cell GT can pivot into helicopter propellers to send the car into the air, for example, and the Mega Alset uses flexible glass windows to resist shattering at high pressures in the ocean’s depths.

Joel/GoCompare
Joel, 11 | The Mega Alset is a hydroelectric vehicle with a shark fin roof, flexible glass windows that resist shattering at deep sea, and wings and a rocket fot it to fly. It also has a voice recognition system.

For 12-year-old Charlotte, whose “Rainbow Convertable 3000” converts between both car and home, the design’s giant wings help it avoid traffic jams.

The Rainbow Convertable 3000 functions as a home as well as a car. Its large wings enable it to fly to avoid traffic jams.
Charlotte/GoCompare
Charlotte, 12 | The Rainbow Convertable 3000 serves as both car and home and has large wings for flight to avoid traffic jams.

Kids may be kids, but their ideas resonate with the most pressing issues that face the automotive and transportation industry: They show an awareness of the need to reduce car pollution, to develop new modes of mobility, and to alleviate congestion. Though it will be several more years before these kids can join the engineering teams, their dream cars offer much-needed inspiration.