STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

This is the immigrant “caravan” Trump is tweeting about

US president Donald Trump tweeted at length about immigration today, following up on yesterday’s references to “caravans” of people heading toward the US border with Mexico.

There is little connection between the approaching “caravan” and the US program Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) cited by the US president. DACA only applies to immigrants who entered the US illegally as minors more then 10 years ago.

The caravan is a group of Central American men, women and children. They number up to 1,000, according to organizers, and are currently traveling through Mexico with the goal of eventually crossing into the US.

Their hope, as Buzzfeed’s Adolfo Flores reports, is that strength in numbers will protect them from the violent cartels that migrants sometimes encounter on the journey north, as well present a logistical challenge for immigration authorities hoping to turn them away.

Hundreds of Central Americans take part in a Via Crucis on Palm Sunday in Tapachula
Hundreds of Central American migrants attend a mass in Tapachula, Mexico on March 25, 2018. (Reuters/Jose Torres)
Hundreds of Central Americans attend a mass before they begin a Via Crucis on Palm Sunday demanding respect for their human rights, in Tapachula
Hundreds of Central American migrants attend a mass on March 25, 2018. (Reuters/Jose Torres)
Hundreds of Central Americans take part in a Via Crucis on Palm Sunday
Hundreds of Central American migrants take part in a Via Crucis on Palm Sunday from Tapachula, Mexico on March 25, 2018. Their banner reads “We are all America no to the discrimination.” (Reuters/Jose Torres)
Central American migrants arrive at in Ixtepec, Oaxaca, Mexico, before continuing their journey to the U.S. despite U.S. President Donald Trump's vow to stamp out illegal immigration
Central American migrants arrive at in Ixtepec, Oaxaca, Mexico, before continuing their journey to the US on March 30. (Reuters/Jose Jesus Cortes)
Central American migrants gather before continuing their journey to the U.S. despite U.S. President Donald Trump's vow to stamp out illegal immigration, in Ixtepec, Oaxaca, Mexico
Central American migrants gather before continuing their journey to the US in Ixtepec, Oaxaca, Mexico March 30, 2018. (Reuters/Jose Jesus Cortes)
Central American migrants gather before continuing their journey to the U.S. despite U.S. President Donald Trump's vow to stamp out illegal immigration, in Ixtepec
Central American migrants gather before continuing their journey to the US (Reuters/Jose Jesus Cortes)
Central American migrants gather before continuing their journey to the U.S. despite U.S. President Donald Trump's vow to stamp out illegal immigration, in Ixtepec
Central American migrants gather before continuing their journey to the US on March 31. (Reuters/Jose Jesus Cortes)
Central American migrants gather before continuing their journey to the U.S. despite U.S. President Donald Trump's vow to stamp out illegal immigration, in Ixtepec
Central American migrants gather in Ixtepec, Oaxaca on March 31, 2018. (Reuters/Jose Jesus Cortes)
Central American migrants rest before continuing their journey to the U.S. despite U.S. President Donald Trump's vow to stamp out illegal immigration, in Ixtepec, Oaxaca
Central American migrants rest in Ixtepec, Oaxaca on March 31. (Reuters/Jose Jesus Cortes)
Central American migrants board a bus before they continuing their journey to the U.S. despite U.S. President Donald Trump's vow to stamp out illegal immigration, in Ixtepec
Central American migrants board a bus before they continuing their journey to the US on March 31. (Reuters/Jose Jesus Cortes)

Read more: Trump’s latest Twitter rant is completely at odds with his administration’s Mexico policy

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