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LETTUCE REJOICE

Scientists grew the first vegetables in Antarctica without soil or sunlight

DLR via Flickr
Scientist Paul Zabel shows off some freshly grown vegetables.
  • Johnny Simon
By Johnny Simon

Deputy Photo Editor

This article is more than 2 years old.

A group of German scientists stationed in Antarctica have successfully grown vegetables in a specially designed sunless, soilless environment. Working out of a shipping container-sized lab in an otherwise barren snowscape, the team gathered about 8 pounds of produce from their first yield, the AP reports, including herbs, lettuce, arugula, and red radishes.

The researchers are working with the EDEN-ISS project, in association with the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The goal of the project is to find possible ways to cultivate food for human missions in space. The hostile environment and isolation of Antarctica provided offer one way for scientists to simulate conditions on Mars or the moon.

DLR via Flickr
Assorted lettuces.
DLR via Flickr
Radishes.
DLR via Flickr
Arugula.
DLR via Flickr
Swiss chard and red mustard greens.
DLR via Flickr
The first collection of harvested vegetables.
DLR via Flickr
Young lettuce plants.
DLR via Flickr
Cilantro, basil, parsley and chive plants.
DLR via Flickr
The EDEN-ISS greenhouse.

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