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An ash cloud visible from space.
SMOKE SIGNALS

The awesome power of volcanos, seen from space

Johnny Simon
By Johnny Simon

Contributor

A number of extremely active volcanos have been steadily erupting across the world over the past few weeks. Their spewing lava, gas, and ash can often be seen for miles surround the eruption sites—and sometimes from outer space.

Here’s what that destructive power looks like, from the point of view of NASA astronauts and satellites orbiting earth.

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Russia’s Klyuchevskaya Sopka volcano erupting in 1994, seen from the Space Shuttle Endeavour.
Drew Feustel/NASA
Hawaii’s Kilauea, seen erupting in May of 2018.
NASA
An eruption of Italy’s Mount Etna, seen in 2001 from the International Space Station.
NASA
The Pavlof volcano in Alaska, seein from the International Space Station in 2013.
NASA
Russia’s Shiveluch volcano, seen in 2010.
NASA
Ash plume from Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull volcano in 2010.
NASA
Papua New Guinea’s Rabaul volcano seen in 1994 from the space shuttle Discovery.
NASA
Papua New Guinea’s Manam Volcano released a thin, faint plume on June 16, 2010.
NASA
A closer view of the Puyehue-Cordon volcano.
NASA
Chile’s Puyehue-Cordon Caulle in 2011, seen by the Terra satellite.
NASA
Mexico’s Popo volcano, seen in 2001 from the International Space Station.
NASA
An array of dormant volcanos in Papua New Guinea.
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