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HAPPY BIRTHSOL

15 years of stunning Mars panoramas from NASA’s Opportunity rover

By Johnny Simon

The Mars Opportunity Rover mission launched 15 years ago this week, on July 7, 2003. Since then, it has sent back to Earth a diverse collection of images, ranging from multi-image panoramas of the vast Martian landscape to selfies of itself.

Opportunity is currently missing in action due to a massive dust storm.  Decreased visibility on the red planet has sent the rover, which relies on solar energy, into a state of hibernation.

NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.
Marathon Valley, seen in 2016
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.
Cape Tribulation, part of the Endeavour Crater, see in 2017.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.
Mars’s Wdowiak Ridge in 2014.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/USGS
Spherical stones on the surface of Mars.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.
A view of view of Solander Point
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.
A rock spire in the Spirit of St. Louis crater
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/Arizona State Univ.
A false color panorama of Greeley Haven.
NASA/JPL-Caltech
Treadmarks left behind by the Opportunity rover
NASA/JPL-Caltech
A view inside the Endeavor Crater
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.
A false color panorama of Pillinger Point, on the western rim of Endeavour Crater
NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ.
Hinner’s Point, on the northern edge of Marathon Valley, seen in 2015
NASA/JPL
The Opportunity rover captured a picture of its own shadow in 2004.