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A ship stranded on the shore of Wani, Donggala on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, after an earthquake and tsunami hit the area,
Antara Foto/Muhammad Adimaja via Reuters
A ship stranded on the shore of Wani, Donggala on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, after an earthquake and tsunami hit the area,
SULAWESI SUFFERS

The aftermath of Indonesia’s devastating tsunami, which has killed more than 800 people

Johnny Simon
By Johnny Simon

Deputy Photo Editor

A 7.5 magnitude earthquake on Friday (Sept. 28) on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi triggered a tsunami which as of today (Oct. 1) has killed more than 800 people and left a trail of destruction across the island.

The death toll is likely to keep rising. While the city of Palu has suffered some of the worst damage and most fatalities, remote portions of the island have been cut off from communications, and infrastructure, the BBC reports.

Officials blame the slow rescue response on the lack of machinery needed to clear heavy rubble. The AP reports that the voices of people trapped in the rubble of an eight-story hotel in Palu that collapsed could still be heard as of Sunday evening. NPR notes that relief groups are already stretched thin throughout Indonesia, with some staff currently working on the island of Lombok, which had its own earthquake in August.

Photos from this morning and the previous few days capture the scope of the damage. The view on the ground in Palu is a chaotic mess of flooded and toppled buildings, collapsed bridges, and injured and dead being pulled from wreckage. Thousands of survivors have fled to a local airport in search of food, shelter, or a way off the island. Aerial images underscore just how much the surrounding landscape was altered by the tsunami, which at points brought 20-foot-tall (6 meter) waves.

Reuters/Beawiharta
People watch the ground sinking in the Balaroa sub-district of Palu, Sulawesi Island, Indonesia.
Antara Foto/Muhammad Adimaja via Reuters
A man walks on a street in Donggala, Central Sulawesi.
Antara Foto/Muhammad Adimaja via Reuters
A ship is seen stranded on the shore of Wani, Donggala, Central Sulawesi.
Reuters/Athit Perawongmetha
A collapsed bridge in Palu.
A destroyed truck in Palu.
Antara Foto/Basri Marzuki via Reuters
An rescue team searches for victims and survivors at the earthquake-damaged Roa Roa hotel in Palu.
Antara Foto/Sahrul Manda Tikupadang via Reuters
An Indonesian soldier carries an elderly woman at the Hasanuddin Airport in Makassar, South Sulawesi. The woman was evacuated from her home in Palu,
Antara Foto/ Akbar Tado via Reuters
People affected by the earthquake and tsunami wait to be airlifted out by military planes at the Mutiara Sis Al Jufri Airport in Palu.
Reuters/Athit Perawongmetha
Inside the damaged Mutiara Sis Al Jufri Airport in Palu.
Antara Foto/Muhammad Adimaja via Reuters
An aerial view of the Baiturrahman mosque in West Palu, after it was hit by a tsunami.
Antara Foto/Muhammad Adimaja via Reuters
An aerial view shows a damaged bridge in Palu.
AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana
People survey damage outside an earthquake in Indonesia.
AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana
A man takes a photo of a car that was lifted off the ground and thrown into a building by the earthquake and tsunami.
Reuters/Athit Perawongmetha
Damage to the Mutiara Sis Al Jufri Airport in Palu.
Tezar Kodongan via Reuters
A still from a drone video showing the severe damage suffered by a department store in Palu.
Antara Foto/ Muhammad Adimaja via Reuters
An aerial view of Taman Ria’s beach , post-tsunami.
Reuters/Beawiharta
Women with their belongings are evacuated to higher ground after the tsunami hit Lolik beach near Palu.
Reuters/Beawiharta
Cars trapped in sinking ground in Palu.
Antara Foto/ Hafidz Mubarak A via Reuters
An aerial view of the city of Palu, showing the post-earthquake devastation.
Antara Foto/Muhammad Adimaja via Reuters
Earthquake and tsunami survivors look for undamaged supplies in a warehouse in Palu.
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