Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former personal lawyer, finishes reading his opening statement as he testifies before the House Oversight and Reform Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
Don’t take my word.
PAPER TRAIL

See the documents Michael Cohen is using to make his case against Trump

By Ana Campoy

Michael Cohen accused his former boss of being a “conman” and a “cheat” during his congressional testimony on Wednesday (Feb. 27)—and brought evidence to prove his claims.

Donald Trump’s’ former personal lawyer submitted a variety of documents to the US House Committee on Oversight and Reform.

Cohen said he dug them up from boxes in storage so that lawmakers take them as the truth, instead of his word. Here are the most prominent exhibits he attached to his testimony:

Trump’s financial statements

Cohen included Trump’s personal financial statements from 2011 to 2013, which suggest the president dramatically inflated his net worth.

US House Committee on Oversight and Reform
Donald Trump’s personal financial statements
US House Committee on Oversight and Reform
Donald Trump’s 2011 personal financial statement
US House Committee on Oversight and Reform
Donald Trump’s 2012 personal financial statement.

 

US House Committee on Oversight and Reform
Donald Trump’s 2013 personal financial statement

Hush money

Cohen also provided documentation for the $130,000 payment he made to Stephanie Clifford, a porn actress also known as Stormy Daniels. He said he tapped a home equity line to pay her himself, to avoid the payment being connected to Trump.

Trump later reimbursed Cohen via personal checks, copies of which Cohen submitted to Congress.

US House Committee on Oversight and Reform
Trump wrote Cohen a personal check.

Trump’s grades

Cohen also included a copy of a letter he sent Fordham University, which Trump attended as an undergraduate before transferring to the University of Pennsylvania. In it, he threatened suing administrators if they released his academic records. “The irony wasn’t lost on me at the time that Mr. Trump in 2011 had strongly criticized president Obama for not releasing his grades,” Cohen said as part of his written testimony.

US House Committee on Oversight and Reform
Letter to Fordham University.