Skip to navigationSkip to content
CLUELESS JOE

Joe Biden just inflicted more pain on his candidacy by trying to undo the debate damage

Joe Biden defended his record on civil rights during a speech in Chicago today—and may have further damaged his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination instead. Speaking at the Rainbow Push Coalition, a group of nonprofits organized by Jesse Jackson, Biden spoke about the importance of the labor movement, Martin Luther King Jr.'s support for unions, and pledged to undo the Donald Trump-backed tax bill that cut taxes for the wealthy and corporations. (The entire speech is on CSPAN). Then he spoke about the differences in values of homes in black neighborhoods and white ones, before speaking to the diverse  social-justice-minded audience about the importance of recognizing that teenagers in hooded sweatshirts were not all violent criminals. @VanJones68 At a Rainbow Push Coalition conference Joe Biden just said... "Maybe that kid in a hoodie could be the next poet laureate and not a gang banger" Joe has got to go pic.twitter.com/VD3NiGQaWt — One Star Kyle ★✰✰✰✰ (@MrStinkFingers) June 28, 2019 "We need to make sure that black mothers feel confident when they send their son out on the street that they will be safe," Biden said. "We've got to recognize that kid wearing a hoodie may very well be a poet laureate, and not a gang banger." Biden was confronted by California senator Kamala Harris during last night's Democratic debate in Miami about his lack of support for desegregation of US schools the 1970s "I do not believe you are a racist," Harris said to Biden before telling him that she felt hurt by his wistful reminiscing about his 1970s friendships with two senators who "built their reputations and careers on segregation and race," referring to Biden's recent remarks about working with James Eastland of Mississippi and Herman Talmadge of Georgia. "You also worked with them to oppose busing," Harris said. "You know there was a little girl in California who was part of the second class to integrate public schools, and she was bused to school every day. And that little girl was me. So, it cannot be an intellectual debate among Democrats. We have to take it seriously and we have to act swiftly." His comments today are likely to increase concerns that a man elected as a US senator from Delaware at age 29 in 1972 is out of touch with Democrats today.
Reuters/Kamil Krzaczynski
He did it again.
By Heather Timmons
Published Last updated This article is more than 2 years old.

Joe Biden defended his record on civil rights during a speech in Chicago today—and may have further damaged his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination instead.

Speaking at the Rainbow Push Coalition, a group of nonprofits organized by Jesse Jackson, Biden spoke about the importance of the labor movement, Martin Luther King Jr.’s support for unions, and pledged to undo the Donald Trump-backed tax bill that cut taxes for the wealthy and corporations. (The entire speech is on CSPAN).

Then he spoke about the differences in values of homes in black neighborhoods and white ones, before speaking to the diverse,  social-justice-minded audience about the importance of recognizing that teenagers in hooded sweatshirts were not all violent criminals.

“We need to make sure that black mothers feel confident when they send their son out on the street that they will be safe,” Biden said. “We’ve got to recognize that kid wearing a hoodie may very well be a poet laureate, and not a gang banger.”

Biden was confronted by California senator Kamala Harris during last night’s Democratic debate in Miami about his lack of support for desegregation of US schools the 1970s

“I do not believe you are a racist,” Harris said to Biden before telling him that she felt hurt by his wistful reminiscing about his 1970s friendships with two senators who “built their reputations and careers on segregation and race,” referring to Biden’s recent remarks about working with James Eastland of Mississippi and Herman Talmadge of Georgia.

“You also worked with them to oppose busing,” Harris said. “You know there was a little girl in California who was part of the second class to integrate public schools, and she was bused to school every day. And that little girl was me. So, it cannot be an intellectual debate among Democrats. We have to take it seriously and we have to act swiftly.”

His comments today are likely to increase concerns that a man elected as a US senator from Delaware at age 29 in 1972 is out of touch with Democrats today.

📬 A periodic dispatch from the annual session of the United Nations General Assembly in NYC.

By providing your email, you agree to the Quartz Privacy Policy.