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Women's World Cup Champions Parade
REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich
All hail the returning World Cup champions.
MAKE THAT FOUR

Photos: US World Cup champs rock New York parade amid “equal pay” chants

By Steve Mollman

The US women’s national soccer team rolled up Broadway in a ticker-tape parade this morning in New York City, cheered by thousands thrilled by their victory in the World Cup final over the weekend in France.

Mayor Bill de Blasio joined stars including Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan, and Julie Ertz on one float—featuring a globe bearing the words “World Champions” around its equator—before handing each of the players a symbolic key to the city.

The heavily favored defending champions defeated the Netherlands 2-0 Sunday, living up to their promises and winning the trophy for a fourth time while earning kudos from all corners.

They didn’t just win, though. They dominated. Not once did the squad trail in a game. Their seven opponents managed to score just three goals, while the US team racked up 26. They have a claim to be considered the greatest women’s soccer team of all time.

Now comes the hard part. The players’ highly publicized legal fight to be paid on par with the US men’s squad hasn’t been nearly as successful. Some of the signs held up by fans referenced the struggle, as did chants of “equal pay!”

How the players fare in that battle remains to be seen, but their dominating performance on the field made any justifications for the pay inequality look weaker than ever.

The parade didn’t hurt, either.

REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich
Fans at the New York parade celebrate the US women’s national team following its World Cup victory.
REUTERS/Mike Sega
Players celebrate the US women’s side winning a fourth World Cup title.
Robert Deutsch-USA TODAY Sports
Forward and co-captain Megan Rapinoe strikes her famous pose.
REUTERS/Mike Segar
Fans cheer on the US women’s team as they move along Broadway
REUTERS/Mike Segar
The larger battle: A fan holds up a sign questioning the US women’s team earning less than the men’s squad.