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Most Americans support Israel, but would rather not pay for its weapons

As the horrific conflict in Gaza continues, the US public opinion on support for Israel is changing, and not as one sided as earlier thought and portrayed by media, a survey I did recently showed.

And now, a broader survey I did in the last few days shows more nuances to that on two fronts:

One, that more Americans favor a continued close relationship between Israel and our own country than don’t, as it has been historically (though majority of us don’t care, that’s America for you).

Two, a large majority of Americans don’t want to continue to provide funds to Israel for its military yearly as we do now currently.

The two Google Consumer Surveys I did tell a story of not ignoring the special history between the two countries, but not funding its military in the future either at the cost of America’s own needs.

The first survey results here, the second are here, you can go dig in.

The first survey question: Should United States-Israel close relationship continue in the future? The result, in the chart below: Majority don’t care, but out of Americans who do, majority want to continue having the close relationship.

gaza1

The second question I asked: Should United States continue to provide its $3 billion annual funding to Israel? And the results, below: a majority 41% of Americans don’t want to provide the continuing $3 billion a year aid to Israel, while 25% still want to do that. A large 35% of Americans don’t care one way or the other.

gaza2

Digging further into the second question, interestingly and perhaps not surprisingly, the young favor not continue the funding, while the older American demographic (65+) do.

gaza3

So there you have it. Lesson: always keep betting on the next generation and against established orthodoxies.

The full picture on US annual funding to Israel is explained in this short video below, from AJ+:

The two single-question survey were administered to the US internet population from July 30-Aug, through Google Consumer Surveys, with 500 responses each. The methodology is explained here.

This post originally appeared on Rafat Ali’s blog. Follow Rafat on Twitter@Rafat. We welcome your comments at ideas@qz.com.

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