The city that never sleeps is blanketed in snow, and it is beautiful

Central Park in the snow.
Central Park in the snow.
Image: Flickr/Anthony Quintano
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The great #Blizzardof2015 had already dumped several inches of snow on the greater New York City area by late Monday evening EST, and many transportation links, including subways, bridges, and tunnels, are closed in anticipation of an historic snowfall on the east coast. “Non-essential” travel is now banned in the city.

Before nightfall, the falling snow rendered some of the busiest parts of the city nearly unrecognizable:

Mid-town Manhattan on Jan. 26.
Mid-town Manhattan on Jan. 26.
Image: Reuters/Carlo Allegri
A snow blower on Lexington Avenue near the Grand Central Terminal.
A snow blower on Lexington Avenue near the Grand Central Terminal.
Image: Reuters/Carlo Allegri

And wreathed some of city’s iconic landmarks and most famous spots in white:

At Liberty State Park.
At Liberty State Park.
Image: AP Photo/Julio Cortez

While dusting the city’s wildlife (this photo and the one on the top of the post are by photographer Anthony Quintano, who seems to have spent most of the night shooting).

In Central Park.
In Central Park.
Image: Flickr/Creative Commons/Anthony Quintano

It turned office roofs into winter playgrounds.

The roof of Quartz’s office in Manhattan.
The roof of Quartz’s office in Manhattan.
Image: Quartz/Mia Mabanta

The park near Brooklyn’s Borough Hall looked like it might have 100 years ago:

Borough Hall, downtown Brooklyn.
Borough Hall, downtown Brooklyn.
Image: Reuters/Stephanie Keith

Along the Brooklyn Promenade, residents took advantage of the already accumulated snow to do some sledding before heading home for the night:

The Brooklyn Promenade with the Manhattan skyline in the background.
The Brooklyn Promenade with the Manhattan skyline in the background.
Image: AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews

While in Coney Island, practically the only thing that wasn’t turned off was the lights on the renovated Parachute Jump.

In the Bronx, the snow frosted homes:

And blanketed sidewalks:

While in Queens, it covered trees and left streets inches-deep in slush.

The 472,000 residents of Staten Island are practically cut off from the rest of the world. The Verazzano Narrows bridge, which connects the island to Brooklyn, was shut at 11pm on Monday night, the Staten Island Ferry is suspended and bridges and tunnels to New Jersey will also be shut.

You can follow winter storm Juno and its aftermath on the Weather Channel, NJ.com’s liveblog, PIX11’s liveblog, and The New York Times (storm info is outside the paywall).