MORE THAN ONE SIDE

These images reveal what many Baltimore residents actually did today

Baltimore has experienced days of peaceful protests, as well as some violence and rioting, following the death of Freddie Gray and in the days surrounding his funeral. But while photos of rioters smashing windows and jumping on cars have so far dominated in the media, they don’t tell the whole story.

Throughout the city, a new wave of images reveal that many Baltimore residents have spent today cleaning up their city.

Victor Huntley-el thanks law enforcement officers as they stand guard, Tuesday, April 28, 2015, in Baltimore, in the aftermath of rioting following Monday's funeral for Freddie Gray, who died in police custody. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
One volunteer thanked officers this morning (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Members of the community work to clean up a recently looted and burned CVS store in Baltimore, Maryland, United States April 28, 2015.  The day after rioters tore through Baltimore, the city's mayor was criticized on Tuesday for a slow police response to some of the worst U.S. urban unrest in years after the funeral of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who died in police custody. Maryland Governor Larry Hogan said he had called Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake repeatedly Monday but that she held off calling in the National Guard until three hours after violence first erupted.  REUTERS/Jim Bourg - RTX1AP6K
Citizens help clean a CVS that was looted. (Reuters/Jim Bourg)
epa04724416 Volunteers clean up trash at a looted business at the intersection of North Avenue and Fulton Avenue in the wake of protests for the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, 28 April 2015. Gray died of spinal cord injuries on 19 April while in police custody; the US Justice Department announced that they are launching their own investigation into the case.  EPA/NOAH SCIALOM
(EPA/Noah Scialom)
epa04724414 Volunteers clean up trash at a looted business at the intersection of North Avenue and Fulton Avenue in the wake of protests for the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, 28 April 2015. Gray died of spinal cord injuries on 19 April while in police custody; the US Justice Department announced that they are launching their own investigation into the case.  EPA/NOAH SCIALOM
Volunteers are cleaning trash at looted businesses (EPA/Noah Scialom)
epa04724200 People cleaning up outside of a CVS pharmacy in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, 28 April 2015, after the pharmacy was set on fire in the wake of protests for the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, on 27 April 2015. Freddie Gray died on 19 April from a spinal injury sustained while in police custody. Gray's death has sparked protests that led to clashes with police and arrests of dozens of people over the weekend. Maryland Governor Larry Hogan declared a state of emergency in Baltimore on 28 April, as violent protests and arson erupted across the eastern port city.  EPA/JOHN TAGGART
(EPA/John Taggart)
epa04723481 A man walks with his daughter along North Avenue toward a CVS that was on fire during a protest for the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, 27 April 2015. Gray died of spinal cord injuries on 19 April while in police custody; the US Justice Department announced that they are launching their own investigation into the case.  EPA/NOAH SCIALOM
Schools are closed in Baltimore today. (EPA/Noah Scialom)
A man cleans up Pennsylvania avenue as Maryland State police stand guard Monday in Baltimore, Maryland April 28, 2015. Baltimore erupted in violence on Monday as hundreds of rioters looted stores, burned buildings and at least 15 police officers were injured following the funeral of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who died after suffering a spinal injury in police custody. The riots broke out blocks from where the funeral of Gray took place and spread through much of west Baltimore.  REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton - RTX1ANAO
Cleaning Pennsylvania Avenue. (Reuters/Shannon Stapleton)

Schools are closed today, so some children have also been helping with the cleanup efforts, ThinkProgress notes.

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