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“It’s a shame that our military personnel even have to question, have to wonder if they’re respected anymore. It starts from the top.”

Sarah Palin’s crazy logic: Her son’s arrest is Obama’s fault

By Jake Flanagin

It hasn’t taken long for Sarah Palin to make a big splash on the campaign trail for Donald Trump—and she’s making Trump look sane by comparison.

Speaking at a campaign event for the Republican frontrunner in Tulsa, Oklahoma, today, the former Alaska governor and vice presidential candidate addressed the recent arrest of her son, Track. The 26-year-old was charged with domestic violence and a weapons violation after police were called to the Palin family home in Wasilla, Alaska. News of the arrest broke shortly after Palin’s endorsement of Donald Trump last night (Jan. 19).

Palin suggested Obama was to blame for her son’s predicament. Her convoluted argument: Track is suffering from something akin to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), exacerbated by Obama’s alleged mistreatment of veterans.

“I guess it’s kind of the elephant in the room,” Palin said, “Because my own family, going through what we’re going through today with my son, a combat vet having served in a striker brigade fighting for you all, America, in the war zone. But my son, like so many others, they come back a bit different. They come back hardened,” Palin said. Track served in Iraq for 12 months in 2008.

Palin concluded:

They come back wondering if there is that respect for what their fellow soldiers and airmen and every other member of the military have given so sacrificially to this country, and that starts at the top … It’s a shame that our military personnel even have to question, have to wonder if they’re respected anymore. It starts from the top. The question, though, it comes from the top, the question, though, that comes from our own president where they have to look at him and wonder, do you know what we go through do you know what we’re trying to do to secure America and to secure the freedoms that have been bequeathed us.

So when my own son is going through what he goes through coming back, I can certainly relate with other families who kind of feel these ramifications of PTSD and some of the woundedness that our soldiers do return with, and it makes me realize more than ever, it is now or never for the sake of America’s finest that will have that commander in chief who will respect them and honor them.