Skip to navigationSkip to content
POLITICAL PARTY

Watch: Protestors in Brazil plan on bringing down their unpopular president with a choreographed song and dance

Reuters/Marcos Brindicci
Protest or carnival?
  • Ana Campoy
By Ana Campoy

Deputy editor, global finance and economics

Published Last updated This article is more than 2 years old.

The next macarena? Street protestors in Brazil are gearing up to bring down president Dilma Rousseff’s government—by practicing their dance moves.

An activist group, Consciência Patriótica, is asking Brazilians to show their discontent at anti-Rousseff demonstrations Sunday with a bouncy choreography.  Check out Facebook for a step-by-step tutorial.

“Shout strongly Brazilian! Out with Dilma! Out with Lula! Out with PT!” says the refrain of the catchy tune, called “Be Patriotic.” The video has been viewed nearly 175,000 times.

Hundreds of thousands of people throughout Brazil are expected to take to the streets during protests on Sunday as the country sinks into a deeper political crisis. Rousseff’s mentor, former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, was charged with money laundering this week in an investigation linked to the corruption scandal at Petrobras, Brazil’s oil company.  Separately, Rousseff is facing impeachment proceedings for allegedly fudging budget numbers.

Observers worry that violence could break out during the protests. Lula and Rousseff supporters are expected to attend, even as some party leaders ask them to stay home (link in Portuguese).

Protestors’ plans sound more like a carnival. In São Paulo, there will be gigantic balloons à la Macy’s Thanksgiving parade, except they will be of political figures in prison garb, not cartoon characters. Organizers have rented sound equipment and lined up several acts, including a Queen cover band, reports Veja Sao Paulo, a magazine supplement. A variety of impeachment gear, including t-shirts and trumpets, is being promoted online ahead of the event.

Then there’s the anti-impeachment choreography. Consciência Patriótica posted the video earlier this week after “many people from different ages and parts of the country” requested to learn the moves. They are asking followers to perfect their performance for Sunday’s events.

Using dance, the group tells Quartz, “is a way to say that demonstrations are peaceful and orderly environments.”

Not everyone is joining the party mood.

“That choreography is the most bizarre, unnecessary thing,” reads one comment on the group’s Facebook page. “What’s the point of dancing in a protest against the government? I feel embarrassed for them.”

📬 A periodic dispatch from the annual session of the United Nations General Assembly in NYC.

By providing your email, you agree to the Quartz Privacy Policy.