PRIME DAY

Everything money can buy: A look inside Amazon’s massive warehouses

It’s Amazon Prime Day, for shoppers living in the US and a handful of other countries. On this day, users who subscribe to Amazon Prime membership are promised 100,000 special bargains by the e-commerce platform, launching the kind of purchasing frenzy that saw more than 34.4 million items sold last year.

To move all that stuff, Amazon has a sprawling logistics network, designed to deliver most Prime products in just 48 hours. In some warehouses, known as “Fulfillment Centers,” robots have even been introduced to shorten the the “click-to-ship” gap to just 15 minutes. For a peek at the sheer scale of the company’s extraordinary day-to-day operations, you can actually visit six real warehouses across the United States—or just take a look at the dizzying photos below.

Amazon.com Fernley warehouse
The largest bookstore in the world. (AP/Scott Sady)
Workers are seen in the Amazon.co.uk warehouse in  Milton Keynes, north of London
(Reuters/Dylan Martinez)
A worker collects orders at Amazon's fulfilment centre in Rugeley, central England
(Reuters/Phil Noble)
Workers gather items for delivery at Amazon's distribution center in Phoenix
(Reuters/Ralph D. Freso)
A worker walks through the picking tower at the Amazon warehouse in Milton Keynes, England
(Reuters/Kieran Doherty)
Workers are seen in the Amazon.co.uk warehouse in Milton Keynes, north of London
(Reuters/Dylan Martinez)
Worker stacks a shipping trailer with boxed items for delivery at Amazon's distribution center in Phoenix
(Reuters/Ralph D. Freso)
A member of staff pushes a trolley as she collects orders at the Amazon fulfilment centre in Peterborough
(Reuters/Phil Noble)
Workers handle items for delivery at Amazon's new distribution center in Brieselang
(Reuters/Tobias Schwarz)
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