PLANET TEMPEST

NASA’s latest flight over Jupiter reveals beautifully turbulent storm systems

Obsession
Space Business
Obsession
Space Business

From images captured by NASA, Jupiter reveals itself as an exquisite blue marble, shimmering with swirling gold sand.

The Juno Mission recently completed its fifth flyby around Jupiter, after entering the planet’s orbit in July 2016. Its first scientific findings were published today (May 25), in two papers in the journal Science, and 44 papers in Geophysical Research Letters.

Some of the most beautiful data obtained during the flybys are images captured by the spacecraft’s JunoCam, which showed massive storm systems on the planet, and allow scientists to understand the planet’s atmosphere, climate, and its north and south poles.

Here’s a look at images captured during some of its recent flybys:

This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 km). The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles (1,000 km) in diameter. Multiple images taken with the JunoCam instrument on three separate orbits were combined to show all areas in daylight, enhanced color, and stereographic projection.
This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles (52,000 km). The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles (1,000 km) in diameter. Multiple images taken with the JunoCam on three separate orbits were combined to show all areas in daylight, enhanced color, and stereographic projection. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles)
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This sequence shows 14 enhanced-color images obtained by JunoCam as it swoops by the planet in just two hours, from north to south pole. (NASA/SWRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/Seán Doran)
This image, taken on March 27, 2017 by the JunoCam about 12,400 miles (20,000 kilometers) from the planet, highlights a swirling storm just south of one of the white oval storms on Jupiter.
This image, taken on March 27, 2017 by the JunoCam about 12,400 miles (20,000 kilometers) from the planet, highlights a swirling storm just south of one of the white oval storms on Jupiter. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Jason Major)
This enhanced color Jupiter image showcases several interesting features on the apparent edge (limb) of the planet.
This enhanced-color Jupiter image showcases several features on the apparent edge (limb) of the planet. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Bjorn Jonsson)
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This enhanced-color view of Jupiter’s cloud tops was processed by citizen scientist Bjorn Jonsson using data from the JunoCam. The image highlights a massive, counterclockwise-rotating storm that appears as a white oval in the gas giant’s southern hemisphere. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Bjorn Jonsson)
This enhanced-color view of Jupiter’s south pole was created by citizen scientist Gabriel Fiset, taken on Dec. 11, 2016, from an altitude of about 32,400 miles (52,200 kilometers) above the planet’s beautiful cloud tops of Jupiter's south pole.
This enhanced-color view of Jupiter’s south pole was created by citizen scientist Gabriel Fiset, taken on Dec. 11, 2016, from an altitude of about 32,400 miles (52,200 kilometers) above the cloud tops of Jupiter’s south pole. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gabriel Fiset)
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