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Sail Ho Studio

Good morning.

The rooms where impeachment happens

The impeachment trial tells a bittersweet story of American dreams. Despite the process (potentially) excluding witnesses, senators who are likely to vote on party lines, and limits on coverage of the momentous event, Senate proceedings still reveal the glory of the republic.Quartz

The Trump impeachment trial tells a bittersweet story of American dreams

I have had the great pleasure and privilege of attending the Senate impeachment trial, having secured coveted passes. Restricted access has limited coverage of the proceedings though.

Here, I explain why that should matter to the public and what I’ve been seeing in the Senate chamber from the press

I have had the great pleasure and privilege of attending the Senate impeachment trial, having secured coveted passes. Restricted access has limited coverage of the proceedings though.

Here, I explain why that should matter to the public and what I’ve been seeing in the Senate chamber from the press gallery and beyond ... as I live the dream.

As a new American, I too observed the impeachment proceedings with a mix of respect and disappointment. It is inspiring to witness a process that was designed with a profound belief that representatives would act in good faith and be patriots, first of all. And it's just as depressing to watch these

As a new American, I too observed the impeachment proceedings with a mix of respect and disappointment. It is inspiring to witness a process that was designed with a profound belief that representatives would act in good faith and be patriots, first of all. And it's just as depressing to watch these ideals capitulate to a reality in which the jury seems entirely prejudiced.

This feels like a test of how prepared the system is to handle the worst instincts of power—a test the system is not going to pass.

Grasping the scale of the coronavirus outbreak

The World Economic Forum wraps up

TikTok can't shake suspicions

Getting better all the time

We can all make better decisions about risk. In the first episode of RISK, Quartz’s new video series for members, psychologist Gerd Gigerenzer explains why most of us are “risk illiterate” and how, precisely, we can change that. ✦Quartz

Most of us are “risk illiterate”—but we can fix that

I like the 'frequency' approach presented here. I had previously been introduced to the breast cancer question while trying (..vainly!...) to teach myself Bayesian probability. Obviously, both approaches end up with the same result, but the graphic representing frequency is FAR simpler to grasp quickly

I like the 'frequency' approach presented here. I had previously been introduced to the breast cancer question while trying (..vainly!...) to teach myself Bayesian probability. Obviously, both approaches end up with the same result, but the graphic representing frequency is FAR simpler to grasp quickly and internalize. Looking forward to the remaining videos in this series.

The word "risk" is rooted in danger. But in practice, it's mostly a good thing. That's the underlying premise of our new show, RISK. This first episode took us to the world's first Center for Risk Literacy in Berlin and the flagship site of a now defunct criminal consumer electronics empire in New York

The word "risk" is rooted in danger. But in practice, it's mostly a good thing. That's the underlying premise of our new show, RISK. This first episode took us to the world's first Center for Risk Literacy in Berlin and the flagship site of a now defunct criminal consumer electronics empire in New York. In my research, I was most surprised to learn that the smallest shift in the way we present information can have life-or-death consequences– and that it's not common knowledge. I'm interested to hear any questions this video prompted, as well as what you'd like to see more of in all of our future shows.

While working on this video, I really started to think about how I take on risk every day. What started as something I only thought about in terms of personal finance quickly turned into ways I could apply this thinking to other parts of my life. Becoming more risk literate has made it much easier to

While working on this video, I really started to think about how I take on risk every day. What started as something I only thought about in terms of personal finance quickly turned into ways I could apply this thinking to other parts of my life. Becoming more risk literate has made it much easier to make all kinds of decisions, from the banal (should I bike to work if there’s a 30% chance of rain?) to the emotional (how can I approach a difficult conversation with my family?) I’m especially curious to hear how our viewers will apply the lessons of risk literacy outside of economics.

I wonder if risk taking is cultural? Here in Europe we have fewer startups than in US. Is that connected to us being more risk adverse? Fewer women than men start disruptive companies. Is that connected to risk taking?

So you want to be a household manager

The future of finance

If you want Goldman Sachs to take your company public, you’re going to need a woman on the board. It’s not necessarily a bid to improve diversity for altruistic reasons—Goldman says its own data shows that the companies that have more diverse board members perform better on the market.Reuters

Goldman Sachs to companies: Hire at least one woman director if you want to go public

Great way to take concrete steps toward better representation and overall company performance. Companies with diverse leadership and an inclusive workforce have been shown to have a reduction in staff turnover, an improvement in productivity and in many cases an increase in revenue.

As Goldman Sachs

Great way to take concrete steps toward better representation and overall company performance. Companies with diverse leadership and an inclusive workforce have been shown to have a reduction in staff turnover, an improvement in productivity and in many cases an increase in revenue.

As Goldman Sachs uses their muscle to create change, let’s hope others follow suit!

No one needs an 8K TV

The next level of gaming

In the 2000s, the average open-world game took just under 30 hours complete. But by the 2010s, many had stretched into 50-hour sagas. Quartz’s Amrita Khalid takes a look at how major game studios came to decide that longer is better. ✦Quartz

Why do studios release such long video games?

It will be very interesting to see where games go from here with the inclusion of advancing AI and procedurally generation content. I could see a future where a game would never end and there is a continuing story that keeps updating depending on what the player does, a bit like the Nemesis system used

It will be very interesting to see where games go from here with the inclusion of advancing AI and procedurally generation content. I could see a future where a game would never end and there is a continuing story that keeps updating depending on what the player does, a bit like the Nemesis system used in "Shadow of Mordor" but to drive the main story content, rather than side storys.

Quartzy: the train travel edition

We're obsessed with rats now!

That's the tail end of your briefing. See you soon.