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Richard A. Chance

Good afternoon.

Economics Nobel prize

The Nobel prize for economic sciences was announced. The joint winners are Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo, and Michael Kremer, for their work in alleviating global poverty.

Three professors won the 2019 Nobel prize for economics for their work on fighting poverty

In India, where he was born and completed his early studies, the praise for Banerjee might be grudging, at best. He is not a supporter of the current government and has been a dissenting voice on several key issues. As I write this, the prime minister, so prolific on social media, is yet to offer any

In India, where he was born and completed his early studies, the praise for Banerjee might be grudging, at best. He is not a supporter of the current government and has been a dissenting voice on several key issues. As I write this, the prime minister, so prolific on social media, is yet to offer any congratulations to only the tenth Nobel laureate of Indian origin.

The last Nobel for poverty alleviation went to Muhammad Yunus, the Bangladeshi social entrepreneur, banker and economist, for founding the Grameen Bank and pioneering the concepts of microcredit and microfinance. But he didn’t get an economics Nobel. He won the Peace Prize. It seems significant that

The last Nobel for poverty alleviation went to Muhammad Yunus, the Bangladeshi social entrepreneur, banker and economist, for founding the Grameen Bank and pioneering the concepts of microcredit and microfinance. But he didn’t get an economics Nobel. He won the Peace Prize. It seems significant that the work of Esther Duflo and her longtime collaborator and partner Abhijit Banerjee (as well as Michael Kremer) has been recognised in this way. That too, just days ahead of the UN’s International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, a rather anodyne designation, but now given a new focus. A different-strokes-for-different-folks approach that truly tries to understood how the poor make decisions about housing, healthcare, hygiene products even.

Quartz Members: What comes after the iPhone?

Can Apple do it again? The iPhone turned Apple from a successful computer company into the world’s most profitable consumer electronics operation. But as this Quartz member exclusive shows, its success could also spell Apple’s undoing.

Can Apple do it again?

Apple is at crossroads. It revolutionized the way we communicate with the iPhone nearly 13 years ago, but its longtime cash cow has started to waver. Apple has a host of new bets in the works, some that could also change the world as the iPhone did. But will any of them actually be able to do it?

Apple’s streaming service is surrounded by questions. We know that Apple TV+ will cost $4.99, that it’ll launch on Nov. 1 with eight original series, and that it won’t have ads. But most of the rest is still a mystery.

Trying to dominate TV is like nothing Apple has ever done before

It is smart to offer the service at $5/month...

I am not convinced that Apple will dominate original content out of the gate. It would depend heavily upon personnel. Everyone loves to festoon Netflix and Amazon with developmental praise but from what I’ve seen, most of their best content is leftovers

It is smart to offer the service at $5/month...

I am not convinced that Apple will dominate original content out of the gate. It would depend heavily upon personnel. Everyone loves to festoon Netflix and Amazon with developmental praise but from what I’ve seen, most of their best content is leftovers from things developed elsewhere. I truly believe that unless you bring on the behind-the-scenes creatives, your front-of-house content will not have the same depth and stamina boasted by the long term heavy hitters like HBO. Not to mention half of what Netflix distributes was created entirely independent of the studio, which is cool and great but doesn’t prove that the newcomers have the secret sauce recipe. It just indicates they can recognize another’s well conceived ideas and then distribute them, which is a very smart way to build your catalogue and brand loyalty while waiting for the truly original content to resonate. Apple doesn’t have a catalogue and the current trend of pulling libraries is likely to continue.

Apple did right to bring over some great industry heavy hitters but imagining yourself as a direct competitor of HBO is a bit like me taking my first novel to Random House.

Online in China

CEO-ing

Marathon records shattered

Eliud Kipchoge broke the two-hour marathon barrier. But it took a team of 42 other runners and one electric car to keep the 34-year-old Kenyan on pace to finish in 1 hour 59 minutes and 40 seconds.

It took 43 of the world’s fastest runners to break the 2-hour marathon barrier

Most people will only remember Kipchoge, but there was a dream team of world class runners surrounding him yesterday. Perhaps the event should also be remembered for the massive collection of talent that put their egos to the side to help him do the seemingly impossible.

Amazing effort by all involved. Kipchoge is a phenomenal athlete, one of the best runners of all time. This was a great use of strategy and technology, as well as his sheer will to achieve the impossible, to push him past the limit.

Turkey attacks Syrian Kurds

Russia bombed hospitals in Syria. A New York Times investigation found the attacks were part of a coordinated strategy to stamp out resistance to Syrian president Bashar al-Assad.

12 Hours. 4 Syrian Hospitals Bombed. One Culprit: Russia.

Four hospitals bombed in just 12 hours – all four of which were on the UN’s deconfliction list, meaning Russian and Syrian forces knew exactly what they were targeting, knew that doctors and patients would die, and they still destroyed them. Impunity is what happens when generals and despots believe

Four hospitals bombed in just 12 hours – all four of which were on the UN’s deconfliction list, meaning Russian and Syrian forces knew exactly what they were targeting, knew that doctors and patients would die, and they still destroyed them. Impunity is what happens when generals and despots believe the rules don’t matter and that they will face no consequences for violating them. These attacks make it clear that we’re living in an Age of Impunity.

Brexit fatigue

Brexit negotiators make a last-ditch effort to cut a deal. Discussions are in overdrive ahead of Thursday and Friday's European Council summit. But the continent is tired of reading about it, and the media has moved on in Paris, Rome, and Madrid.

Brexit negotiations are heating up for real, but the continent is tired of reading about it

As I was going through the news this morning for my weekend shift, it was obvious that Brexit was a still a big story in London, but not so much in Rome or Paris. That’s even though the negotiations are maybe, possibly, potentially, finally getting somewhere. Everyone has Brexit fatigue at this point

As I was going through the news this morning for my weekend shift, it was obvious that Brexit was a still a big story in London, but not so much in Rome or Paris. That’s even though the negotiations are maybe, possibly, potentially, finally getting somewhere. Everyone has Brexit fatigue at this point, but that’s doesn’t mean it’s not important.

Free Willy

Come back soon

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Tech Companies Like Facebook and Twitter Are Drawing Lines. It’ll Be Messy.

Big tech companies are asking themselves where their responsibilities start and stop. Sorting that out will be complicated and may end up increasing their power.

Read more on The New York Times

From Our Members

  • This underscores the advantages that principles-based approaches — decision making based on overarching goals and values — can have over rules-based approaches. It’s hard to legislate for every outlier, every edge case. When you’ve got a digital, algorithm-driven business like Facebook, you have no choice

    This underscores the advantages that principles-based approaches — decision making based on overarching goals and values — can have over rules-based approaches. It’s hard to legislate for every outlier, every edge case. When you’ve got a digital, algorithm-driven business like Facebook, you have no choice but to operate by rules-based systems. The human factor makes a difference. How, when and where you apply principles are the ethical judgments that define culture and society. If we decide to delegate them to rules-based machines, we lose.

  • In a free society it is necessary to take the bad with the good. Although it is important to identify and expose misinformation, whether or not it’s willful, we cannot allow any entity, public or private, to use the less desirable products of freedom as an excuse to curtail our liberties. Remember, tyranny

    In a free society it is necessary to take the bad with the good. Although it is important to identify and expose misinformation, whether or not it’s willful, we cannot allow any entity, public or private, to use the less desirable products of freedom as an excuse to curtail our liberties. Remember, tyranny comes to power wrapped in the flag.

  • Glad to see social network companies stepping up in policing content within their networks. However, as the article suggested, they are bound to make mistakes especially with topics in grey area. I hope these tech companies would work together on this important topic as each holds pieces of the puzzles.

  • Alternative headline: Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey will be deciding what news you should be allowed to see.

  • "Get over it." "Change is inevitable!"

    Can we trot out any more cliche bromides in an effort to curry favor with the social media juggernauts that have done nothing but show indifference to privacy, security and civility?

    Like the naively utopian "information must be free" ethos that killed credible

    "Get over it." "Change is inevitable!"

    Can we trot out any more cliche bromides in an effort to curry favor with the social media juggernauts that have done nothing but show indifference to privacy, security and civility?

    Like the naively utopian "information must be free" ethos that killed credible journalism in the early days of the Internet, the wholesale abandonment of oversight and respect for community standards (libel laws, slander, etc.), on Twitter and Facebook and their abject denials that they are in fact media companies and publishers is what has led to the current state of affairs regarding political dialogue, fake news versus fiction and the ascendency of opinion over fact-based reporting (even when the opinions are factually incorrect).

    Now that it's impacting the bottom line, however, the sociopathic behavior will only be tempered by greed and not morality. And these people are to be admired? Pass.

  • Yes it will be messy. Why would we ever presume that change, evolution is painless and fun. GET OVER it. Change is inevitable. Change can be amazing and challenging.

  • Detoxifying Facebook and Twitter is going to be a challenge because oversight does not exist.

    Reddit combatted this out the door with “founding members” that were tasked with assigning a commenting strategy for their subreddits. 1% of Reddit’s users cause 75% of all conflict on the platform. Try to

    Detoxifying Facebook and Twitter is going to be a challenge because oversight does not exist.

    Reddit combatted this out the door with “founding members” that were tasked with assigning a commenting strategy for their subreddits. 1% of Reddit’s users cause 75% of all conflict on the platform. Try to spread disinformation and you are instantly called out. As a democratized platform if you love fringe discussions or enjoy being lied to there’s a room for that too.

  • We do have to start somewhere!

  • This seems like an over reaction, and is going to end up censoring good information along with the bad. If left alone long enough the market would self correct, fake news would automatically filter as we became more aware, and the work would move on nicely. With this proposed solution we are seeing needless

    This seems like an over reaction, and is going to end up censoring good information along with the bad. If left alone long enough the market would self correct, fake news would automatically filter as we became more aware, and the work would move on nicely. With this proposed solution we are seeing needless government pressure on privately owned companies.

  • I’ve said this before but de-emphasizing certain misinformation by ranking it lower in user feeds seems fraught with problems (to me). It’s FB’s version of having its cake and eating it too. If something is deemed misinformation/flat out wrong, why not wall it off somewhere with giant warning signs

    I’ve said this before but de-emphasizing certain misinformation by ranking it lower in user feeds seems fraught with problems (to me). It’s FB’s version of having its cake and eating it too. If something is deemed misinformation/flat out wrong, why not wall it off somewhere with giant warning signs, or don’t include it all. FB doesn’t want to offend anyone and some of this stuff is very subjective which means that landmines are everywhere. Can’t these outside fact-check assign

    a ranking for accuracy and fairness to each news outlet and make sure it appears along side content so users are aware?

    Unless things changed post election, SocialFlow found that ALL media content reach was essentially cut in half —not one side more than another, so any audit should just go back to Trump’s inauguration through present day.

  • Messy indeed. But necessary.

  • We already know that the stances most of these companies take by default is informed by the laissez-faire small-L libertarian attitudes of most of their founders. And that may be fine in most cases but when these products, such as Facebook and Twitter, are so intrusively shaping so much of human experience

    We already know that the stances most of these companies take by default is informed by the laissez-faire small-L libertarian attitudes of most of their founders. And that may be fine in most cases but when these products, such as Facebook and Twitter, are so intrusively shaping so much of human experience, a time has come for deeper soul-searching and a more active role in defining what human experience should look like and how content and media affect democracy, justice, and quality of life in general in a connected society.

  • "And WhatsApp, Facebook’s messaging subsidiary, said it would limit how widely messages on the service can be forwarded as a way to slow down viral rumors, some of which have led to mob violence in places like India." I had no idea this was even a thing!

  • Well, we hooman beans are just plain messy. It’s our nature and I shudder to think that we delegate to machine logic something that serves us so well...the freedom to be messy. Sure it hurts sometimes, part of the life.