Skip to navigationSkip to content
Close
They don’t own homes. They don't have kids. Why millennials are plant addicts

They don’t own homes. They don't have kids. Why millennials are plant addicts

Read more on Los Angeles Times

Contributions

  • The fact that bloggers and social media influencers are the sources of many quotes in the article should tell you something. People have always, always had two basic identity needs: to fit in and stand out. First guy out of the gate? Gets known for being the plant guy because he has only air mattress

    The fact that bloggers and social media influencers are the sources of many quotes in the article should tell you something. People have always, always had two basic identity needs: to fit in and stand out. First guy out of the gate? Gets known for being the plant guy because he has only air mattress and plants (he describes his friends as making fun of him but I’m betting he means the kind of teasing we all enjoy). Then we have bloggers who lead the trend and revel in being like others (and others being like them).

    Plants. Small dogs. I’m betting cats are due for a resurgence at some point, maybe tropical fish. And that’s conceptually fine - we are just responding to a human need. But what happens when other living things get involved? When the trend passes? Ask your local shelter about how dog trends affect them...and then think carefully about the other side of this story.

  • Fascinating trend that highlights our need for connection and caring in these crazy times. I kind of have a new obsession with succulents myself!

  • Alternate title: “Millennials are ruining not having plants”

  • Articles that straddle hype and mockery like these don’t appear to be going away anytime soon. But I think they highlight an important theme in millennials - that we’ve given up on life.

    Writers tend to find the most extreme examples, such as the people featured here. But there’s an undercurrent in

    Articles that straddle hype and mockery like these don’t appear to be going away anytime soon. But I think they highlight an important theme in millennials - that we’ve given up on life.

    Writers tend to find the most extreme examples, such as the people featured here. But there’s an undercurrent in the themes around millennials that rings true - many have resigned to accept mediocrity in the face of the worldly stress they see. Instead of digging in and fighting to rejoin the economic structures of past generations (long careers at large companies, creative ways to get your first down payment for a home, etc.) or completely re-inventing the economy, most of us have laid down and said to ourselves “I guess I’ll just have do life this way...”

  • I’m surprised this article didn’t proclaim they were all avocado plants.

    People want to make their environment more enjoyable. You can compare plants to art and other home decor.

    People who don’t have kids have plants because they don’t have to worry about walking around the corner and finding a toddler

    I’m surprised this article didn’t proclaim they were all avocado plants.

    People want to make their environment more enjoyable. You can compare plants to art and other home decor.

    People who don’t have kids have plants because they don’t have to worry about walking around the corner and finding a toddler throwing soil all over the floor. I’d have plants all over the place if I could, but, this is a luxury I simply cannot have.

  • Most of millennials are benefitting from what we call"sharing economy". Owning home is high risk now.

    I can live easily anywhere with "a suitscase".

    Maybe I should purchase the hedge plant.