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LEGO goes sustainable with blocks made from sugarcane

By Business Insider Nordic

LEGO wants the majority of its production to be sustainable by 2030. On August 1st it launched its first sustainable LEGO-bricks. The new bricks are made of sugarcane plastic and are shaped as plantsRead full story

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  • First Allbirds, now Legos? Smelling a trend here. While this is definitely a positive step in terms of reducing our dependence on plastic, I’m unconvinced the trade offs are worth it. One, as the article points out, it’s not like this sugarcane plastic is biodegradable — Two, farming sugar cane actually

    First Allbirds, now Legos? Smelling a trend here. While this is definitely a positive step in terms of reducing our dependence on plastic, I’m unconvinced the trade offs are worth it. One, as the article points out, it’s not like this sugarcane plastic is biodegradable — Two, farming sugar cane actually is terrible (especially from industrial farming perspective): it requires a lot of land, water and contributes to habitat destruction, soil erosion, industrial waste and pollution from fertilizer. This feels like a sugar cane farming lobby win, to be honest. (Just like corn ethanol)

    (https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/05/05/476600965/the-environmental-cost-of-growing-food

    https://www.worldwildlife.org/industries/sugarcane)

    So in the end, this isn’t a good solution, but it’s a positive move from a PR standpoint. My fear is that this surface-level change will be heralded and satisfy consumer demand for “more environmentally-forward” products while actually creating more problems than it solves.

  • To Jing’s comment about the externalities of sugarcane production, true. But the technology here doesn’t require the sugars but the plant fibers after sugar production used for silage and little else. They could be doing the same thing with corn husks and just about anything else. So exciting to see

    To Jing’s comment about the externalities of sugarcane production, true. But the technology here doesn’t require the sugars but the plant fibers after sugar production used for silage and little else. They could be doing the same thing with corn husks and just about anything else. So exciting to see a trusted brand shift from oil based plastics to food byproduct upcycling.

  • It's really great to see Lego taking this kind of action--I wonder how much money they're losing? Is this going shift going to be a big hit to the P&L?

    As you all know, I'm deeply suspicious of corporations acting in the public interest, but Lego has a history of being a social responsible company and

    It's really great to see Lego taking this kind of action--I wonder how much money they're losing? Is this going shift going to be a big hit to the P&L?

    As you all know, I'm deeply suspicious of corporations acting in the public interest, but Lego has a history of being a social responsible company and I'm happy to see them setting the bar high here.

  • This is the only way kids should be exposed to sugarcane

  • good news!

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