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‘Humans have always lived in the age of post-truth. We’re a post-truth species’

By the Guardian

In his new book, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, the bestselling author of Sapiens and Homo Deus turns his attention to the problems we face todayRead full story

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  • Long but fascinating read. Fake news - when we’re talking about consciously misleading information and not just when the phrase is used as a pejorative against a story somebody doesn’t like - is really nothing more than propaganda, which is age-old. But there’s a reason why propaganda works. Grab a cup of coffee, a big one, and read on...

  • I love Harari’s work. Although it is upsetting to learn that our seedier sides are so biologically and historically part of us, that also makes me feel more at peace about it.

  • And a much more pessimistic take on the fake news phenomenon. I am, I’m afraid to say, more convinced by this argument.

  • Uncomfortable reads can be the best. To not challenge what we are fed is to be a sheep. But in that challenge can be revealed game changing truths or untruths. The reader still needs to decide. The author bases his truth in science, to deny fake truths among scientists, misled by the same shiny baubles as the rest of us is to deny their humanity!!

  • I enjoyed reading Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Harari. In it he talks about the Sapien advantage over Neanderthal being our ability to form large groups based on belief in an idea. Here he identifies the darker side of that ability. In Sapiens he identifies the brighter side as well. Religions, corporations, countries are all human constructs and can do both good and evil. Perhaps a quest to find the absolute truth is less important than finding a compelling set of ideas that are more

    I enjoyed reading Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Harari. In it he talks about the Sapien advantage over Neanderthal being our ability to form large groups based on belief in an idea. Here he identifies the darker side of that ability. In Sapiens he identifies the brighter side as well. Religions, corporations, countries are all human constructs and can do both good and evil. Perhaps a quest to find the absolute truth is less important than finding a compelling set of ideas that are more likely to lead to peace, and prosperity, harmony. It’s a story we also have the capacity to bond with. So much of our individual lives are driven by the narrative we give to it. Our collective reality can be directed in that way too.

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