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Zack Rosebrugh

Good evening.

Up, up, and away

A jumpsuit for space tourism. Virgin Galactic and Under Armour collaborated on a one-piece suit, underwear, and boot set for those who book an Enterprise spaceflight ticket.

The first commercial spacesuits are like soft, high-tech pajamas

I love the way the spacewear looks and I love the way it feels. I also love the fact that the next time I put it on, I will be on my way to space.

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability in the design. Not sure how many people will be wearing them around after, but the designers hope they will at least sometimes.

Saving WeWork

WeWork is getting a lifeline. SoftBank Group and JP Morgan both have plans to bail out the struggling office-sharing company, CNBC reports. WeWork's board will review the proposals by the end of the week and opt for one or a combination.

SoftBank, JP Morgan to submit separate WeWork bailout proposals in coming days

WeWork is a textbook example of a flawed Silicon Valley start-up. All of this talk of funding and valuation is a way of say that the business was built irrespective of the revenue they got from customers. It would seem that WeWork has (metaphorically) built an empire of solid gold toilets and now investors

WeWork is a textbook example of a flawed Silicon Valley start-up. All of this talk of funding and valuation is a way of say that the business was built irrespective of the revenue they got from customers. It would seem that WeWork has (metaphorically) built an empire of solid gold toilets and now investors are surprised that they can’t get enough customers in the door to keep the lights on.

What I never hear discussed in these talk about wavering SV companies is whether customers are buying their product. Have you looked at the price of a spot in a WeWork office? It’s astronomical for someone starting a small business and apparently the current price point isn’t even enough to cover the costs of goods (I.e. office space) much less turn a profit. Golden toilets.

The Guardian reported that WeWork is close to laying off close to 2,000 employees. But I'm not sure if cutting costs, even at that rate, is going to save the company. It also makes me wonder how a fairly simple business—renting co-working spaces—spiraled out of control. Even though SoftBank has given

The Guardian reported that WeWork is close to laying off close to 2,000 employees. But I'm not sure if cutting costs, even at that rate, is going to save the company. It also makes me wonder how a fairly simple business—renting co-working spaces—spiraled out of control. Even though SoftBank has given WeWork close to $11 billion, the company might be beyond rescue. Hard to say whether SoftBank's throwing good money after bad. Right now, all WeWork has going for it is the company's existing contracts & what's left of its brand. The next month will be intriguing to watch.

Quartz at work

There’s a new generation of networking groups for people of color. Niche social spaces providing a place to get advice, consult with others, network, and vent about work situations, are on the rise.

The impact of workspaces for people of color go beyond feeling welcome

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken and explicit. Trying to learn all the rules and perform them perfectly puts one in a state of "constant translating" as one of my colleagues aptly described. Now couple this state of existence with the historical power structures that create a specific cultural dominance in the corporate and white-collar workplaces. The mere appearance of a diverse workspace isn't inclusivity. Culture manifests in the shows discussed the next day, the humor, language and colloquialisms (code-switching), ideas valued, food eaten in the office, promotions, perception of intelligence, opportunities given, salary, and in media (my industry) the stories considered worth telling. I could go on as this is a complex topic, but TDLR, a place of respite to lay my head and rub minds with folks whom I share similar culture and experience is much needed.

Look, diversity is hard work. It’s a two-way dialogue that requires indomitable humility and incessant curiosity. The world is so big. And in the workplace where foreign backgrounds and experiences clash — let them clash and create new conversations and relationships. Sometimes, you gotta ditch the bagel for some jollof rice. They’re both carbs.

I recommend several NPR’s Code Switch episodes:

1. You Are What You Eat: This week, we tackle reader questions on vegetarianism, the specter of grocery store Columbuses, and the quiet opprobrium directed at "smelly ethnic foods" in the workplace.

2. Respect Yourself - “What does "civility" look like and who gets to define it? What about "respectable" behavior? This week, we're looking at how behavior gets policed in public.”

3. Getting a Foot in the Door - Anali, a young woman from Los Angeles, wants to break into the film industry. A local program taught her the skills of the trade and the language, but will any of that that matter in an industry that runs mostly on connections?”

4. Talk American - What is the “Standard American Accent?" Where is it from? And what does it mean if you don’t have it. Code Switch goes on a trip to the Midwest of find out.

US-China tech diplomacy

Apple users in China: Beware. Privacy advocates worry about the US tech giant’s partnership with Tencent, which has close ties to Beijing, as they think it could share the IP addresses of internet users who try to visit blacklisted sites.

Apple’s data sharing with firms tied to the Chinese government may endanger dissidents

Have you visited a fraudulent site? If so, you likely got a warning from Google. But in China, users get warnings from Tencent, a co. close to the Chinese government. Thus, a service meant to protect users could threaten their freedom. Staying safe (and private) is hard.

The World in 50 Years

Apple's Indian revival

Marking 30 years of the web

The mysterious sounds that defined the early days of the internet. Before we were always online, logging on to the internet was a journey through sound. Here’s what those sounds actually meant.

A series of mysterious bleeps and bloops defined the early days of the Internet

The dial up sound was the soundtrack to a very distinct period in my life, and I never thought about that until I saw a video of the reactions of kids who had never heard it. I found this piece deeply satisfying for a question I never knew I had.

My dad worked on satellites when I was a kid, so my house was an early adopter of many things—including dial-up. I’d constantly request my dad “make the computers talk”—I was obsessed with the sounds modems made! I didn’t realize till I read this article how spot-on my childhood simplification was.

Locked up in America

Stop the presses

Surprising discovery

Come back soon!

Close

Do teens use Facebook? It depends on their family’s income

Read more on Quartz

From Our Members

  • Just like some fashion brands, Facebook has moved from serving the elite to serving the masses. Along the way, it’s become a digital combination of a newspaper and the White Pages.

    Also fascinating is this piece’s exploration of the code switching that happens between social-media platforms.

    But

    Just like some fashion brands, Facebook has moved from serving the elite to serving the masses. Along the way, it’s become a digital combination of a newspaper and the White Pages.

    Also fascinating is this piece’s exploration of the code switching that happens between social-media platforms.

    But the biggest and most terrifying takeaway for me is this: “9.4 million US children aged 12-17 live in low-income households. That’s about 39% of all US adolescents.”

  • An extremely comprehensive and compelling look at how teenage usage of social media differs by income level.

    The main split is utilitarian use in lower income kids vs. recreational use in higher income kids. Lower income students actually use social media in the ways that adhere to Facebook's supposed

    An extremely comprehensive and compelling look at how teenage usage of social media differs by income level.

    The main split is utilitarian use in lower income kids vs. recreational use in higher income kids. Lower income students actually use social media in the ways that adhere to Facebook's supposed mission of connecting people, while higher income students use it simply as a social broadcasting system.

    Facebook's use by teenagers has been on the decline for a while, lucky for them Instagram makes up for that. But with Snap's growth slowing, I think a social platform targeting more affluent teens will pop up any day now.

  • Interesting piece on how socioeconomic status impacts how kids use Facebook vs Instagram and Snap. It is good to see that FB fills certain voids for lower income kids and is used for more serious purposes.

    Not unrelated, headlines used to pop up routinely about FB being an uncool place for kids where

    Interesting piece on how socioeconomic status impacts how kids use Facebook vs Instagram and Snap. It is good to see that FB fills certain voids for lower income kids and is used for more serious purposes.

    Not unrelated, headlines used to pop up routinely about FB being an uncool place for kids where parents and grandparents are snooping —kids seem to leave FB for a time, or just use it less, but they tend to go back when they’re graduating college or as this piece mentions, when they move around . No one needs to worry about addresses or even contacts in their phone —you can find or message anyone anytime through FB or any of the other social media apps.

  • A fascinating data point: that teens from low-income families use Facebook far more than their high-income peers. (Explaining why, though, still involves guesswork.)

  • 41 and realizing that, by 2025, I'll be the only guy left on Facebook telling kids to get off his lawn.

  • Yes- the low income level of 39per cent of Adolescents - that fact alone jumped out at me!! - with all its ramifications, aside from the use of Facebook over Instagram.

  • From a viewpoint, it might be said that Facebook is working well because it gives opportunities to kids who live in low-income households.

  • I do not use SNS to avoid monitoring by my wife.

  • This story talks about how lower income children use Facebook as a place to connect to others and forge social support — using the platform as its idealists had intended. A nice reminder that even Facebook can be used for good still.

  • In Japan Instagram is mounting tool.