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Amazon Is Trying to Buy Movie Chain Landmark Theatres

Amazon Is Trying to Buy Movie Chain Landmark Theatres

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  • Like one user mentioned the vertical integration play looms large. Imagine getting access to movie releases for being a Prime member or other iterations around encouraging the consumer to being a part of Club Amazon. This mirrors the same type of integration they’ve done with their supply chain: create

    Like one user mentioned the vertical integration play looms large. Imagine getting access to movie releases for being a Prime member or other iterations around encouraging the consumer to being a part of Club Amazon. This mirrors the same type of integration they’ve done with their supply chain: create content, control as many channels for that good to be distributed.

  • Not surprising — Amazon has been trying for a while to get into the theater business to give the films they produce better releases. But it does raise a huge red flag, at least to this film history nerd: vertical integration.

    Used to be, studios owned the production and supply chain: if Paramount produced

    Not surprising — Amazon has been trying for a while to get into the theater business to give the films they produce better releases. But it does raise a huge red flag, at least to this film history nerd: vertical integration.

    Used to be, studios owned the production and supply chain: if Paramount produced a movie, it would be released in a Paramount theater. Then the Supreme Court ruled that unconstitutional (United States v. Paramount Pictures, Inc., 1948), which opened the possibilities for distribution and created competition from smaller studios and theaters. So, if Amazon purchases Landmark, or another theater chain, with the expressed purpose of giving their movies prominent releases — which Amazon has stated in the very recent past — then that seems to me to be violating the prohibition on vertical integration, especially if they hold their films out of, say, Regal or AMC theaters or block other studios from booking competing product.

    We're living through perhaps the most radical shift in movie distribution and reception since the 1950s, and shaking up the system is necessary. But Amazon poses a very real regressive threat to how movies are made and watched. (Maybe Bezos' billions means he's above the Supreme Court's rulings...)

  • I've stubbornly avoided an Amazon Prime membership, but if all of a sudden included some sort of MoviePass features at Landmark cinemas - that might finally break me.