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Alessandro Cripsta

Good morning.

No longer the final frontier

A jumpsuit for space tourism. Virgin Galactic and Under Armour collaborated on a one-piece suit, underwear, and boot set for those who book an Enterprise spaceflight ticket.

The first commercial spacesuits are like soft, high-tech pajamas

I love the way the spacewear looks and I love the way it feels. I also love the fact that the next time I put it on, I will be on my way to space.

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability

One of my favorite bits from the unveiling that didn't make it into the story was when Tom Westray, creative director at Virgin Galactic, likened the space suit to a wedding dress. "We realized that this suit is created for this one day," he said—like a wedding dress. It led them to consider reusability in the design. Not sure how many people will be wearing them around after, but the designers hope they will at least sometimes.

What comes after the iPhone?

Diversity in the workplace

There’s a new generation of networking groups for people of color. Niche social spaces providing a place to get advice, consult with others, network, and vent about work situations, are on the rise.

The impact of workspaces for people of color go beyond feeling welcome

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken

Being the only one in a whatever dominant space is mental gymnastics and can become exhausting (it's a psychological workout!). Anyone's that's spent a significant period in a space as "the other" know this exact feeling. Culture is complex. It's nuanced and full of cues, etiquette, decorum -- unspoken and explicit. Trying to learn all the rules and perform them perfectly puts one in a state of "constant translating" as one of my colleagues aptly described. Now couple this state of existence with the historical power structures that create a specific cultural dominance in the corporate and white-collar workplaces. The mere appearance of a diverse workspace isn't inclusivity. Culture manifests in the shows discussed the next day, the humor, language and colloquialisms (code-switching), ideas valued, food eaten in the office, promotions, perception of intelligence, opportunities given, salary, and in media (my industry) the stories considered worth telling. I could go on as this is a complex topic, but TDLR, a place of respite to lay my head and rub minds with folks whom I share similar culture and experience is much needed.

Look, diversity is hard work. It’s a two-way dialogue that requires indomitable humility and incessant curiosity. The world is so big. And in the workplace where foreign backgrounds and experiences clash — let them clash and create new conversations and relationships. Sometimes, you gotta ditch the bagel for some jollof rice. They’re both carbs.

I recommend several NPR’s Code Switch episodes:

1. You Are What You Eat: This week, we tackle reader questions on vegetarianism, the specter of grocery store Columbuses, and the quiet opprobrium directed at "smelly ethnic foods" in the workplace.

2. Respect Yourself - “What does "civility" look like and who gets to define it? What about "respectable" behavior? This week, we're looking at how behavior gets policed in public.”

3. Getting a Foot in the Door - Anali, a young woman from Los Angeles, wants to break into the film industry. A local program taught her the skills of the trade and the language, but will any of that that matter in an industry that runs mostly on connections?”

4. Talk American - What is the “Standard American Accent?" Where is it from? And what does it mean if you don’t have it. Code Switch goes on a trip to the Midwest of find out.

Up, up, and away

Painting, dating, and gaming

The world in 50 years

What will we eat? “A lot more plants,” says scientist and author Bill Nye. Check out the predictions from artist and activist Mai Khôi, Andreessen Horowitz general partner Vijay Pande, transhumanist Zoltan Istvan, and more thought leaders.

The World in 50 Years: What will we eat?

First, what a great project Quartz has put together here. Second, eating will be determined by how fast the microprocessor evolves. If we become full cyborgs dependent on solar, etc, we could very quickly as a species lose our need for biological food altogether. That’s what the Singularity is sbout

First, what a great project Quartz has put together here. Second, eating will be determined by how fast the microprocessor evolves. If we become full cyborgs dependent on solar, etc, we could very quickly as a species lose our need for biological food altogether. That’s what the Singularity is sbout. Radical transformation. Super radical!

Surprising discovery

Locked up in America

Marking 30 years of the web

The mysterious sounds that defined the early days of the internet. Before we were always online, logging on to the internet was a journey through sound. Here’s what those sounds actually meant.

A series of mysterious bleeps and bloops defined the early days of the Internet

The dial up sound was the soundtrack to a very distinct period in my life, and I never thought about that until I saw a video of the reactions of kids who had never heard it. I found this piece deeply satisfying for a question I never knew I had.

My dad worked on satellites when I was a kid, so my house was an early adopter of many things—including dial-up. I’d constantly request my dad “make the computers talk”—I was obsessed with the sounds modems made! I didn’t realize till I read this article how spot-on my childhood simplification was.

Come back soon!

Close
‘The Break With Michelle Wolf’ & ‘The Joel McHale Show’ Canceled By Netflix

‘The Break With Michelle Wolf’ & ‘The Joel McHale Show’ Canceled By Netflix

Read more on Deadline

From Our Members

  • Michelle Wolf’s show was Netflix‘s big experiment into weekly programming (instead of dumping an entire season on the premiere day), but the channel didn’t market it as weekly programming. Most viewers didn’t understand or know how and when to find it. I wouldn’t blame Michelle for this, but rather Netflix’s

    Michelle Wolf’s show was Netflix‘s big experiment into weekly programming (instead of dumping an entire season on the premiere day), but the channel didn’t market it as weekly programming. Most viewers didn’t understand or know how and when to find it. I wouldn’t blame Michelle for this, but rather Netflix’s marketing department—and that is not based on an algorithm.

  • The thing about Netflix is that they have data analysis to back up their decisions (unlike networks with Neilsen data). So when they cancel shows, you know it’s completely rational.

  • Good. I have Netflix. She had her moments but is too politically polarizing. Comedians need to get back to good old fashioned comedy that families can enjoy.

  • When Netflix cancels a show it’s either because of something bad like Kevin Spacey’s situation or the data absolutely supports it. It did seem weird that the staff found out via Twitter from an article I read. If that’s true, then that kind of sucks. These days it’s hard to keep things secret to have

    When Netflix cancels a show it’s either because of something bad like Kevin Spacey’s situation or the data absolutely supports it. It did seem weird that the staff found out via Twitter from an article I read. If that’s true, then that kind of sucks. These days it’s hard to keep things secret to have time to tell everyone, but it’s still worth the effort to communicate to people better directly.

  • My opinion of Netflix just went up a few notches - will be interesting to see if their stock goes up on Monday & if the viewership in general goes up as well! I’ll bet it does.

    Hey MW, go sell your c _ _ t jokes to the DNC, maybe they’ll hire you as their Keynote speaker @ the 2020 Convention!!

    I love days like this!! ;>)

  • A good comedian sees the ridiculousness in any situation. BOTH SIDES.

    I respect comedians who can skewer both sides. Even if they attack one side more than the other.

    But when she goes 100% against one side while cheering the other it is no longer comedy it has now become an editorial.

    John Mullany

    A good comedian sees the ridiculousness in any situation. BOTH SIDES.

    I respect comedians who can skewer both sides. Even if they attack one side more than the other.

    But when she goes 100% against one side while cheering the other it is no longer comedy it has now become an editorial.

    John Mullany did a bit on Trump by comparing him to a “Horse in a hospital” no one has ever seen a horse in a hospital. “What will the horse do? ” he got his point across in a very subtle nuanced way.

    I like Trump but I have to see that the analogy fits. That is why he is so funny.

    Then he even put in a quick joke about Hillary, showing that he saw problems with the democrats as well even though he is one.

    That is all I needed to feel it was now a comedy show and not an op-ed piece.

    A comedian can make fun of your race if he also makes fun of his own.

    He can make fun of you if he also makes fun of himself.

    Commentators like Michelle Wolfe and Samantha B just make a lot of old tired unimaginative lazy Trump /Hitler references.

    That is why they are simply not comedians.

    And if they were funny then people would watch and they would still be on.

  • Let's be very honest about this. Michelle does not appeal to a large audience. She's also, in my opinion, not very funny. It's no mystery her Netflix endeavor was short-lived.

    Joel McHale, however, is a different story. The Soup was popular for mocking the atmosphere and personalities of Hollywood

    Let's be very honest about this. Michelle does not appeal to a large audience. She's also, in my opinion, not very funny. It's no mystery her Netflix endeavor was short-lived.

    Joel McHale, however, is a different story. The Soup was popular for mocking the atmosphere and personalities of Hollywood, and Joel's personality was perfect for the role. In his own book, Joel likened himself to an "arrogant asshole", a persona he perfectly portrayed in Dan Harmon's TV series, Community.

    The problem with his Netflix premier was that he was trying to tell the same exact jokes he told on The Soup, when he was younger and a much more inexperienced comedian and actor. It didn't make much sense, wasn't funny, and relied too heavily on cheesy writing that pulled in random celebrities that Joel is buddy-buddy with. It needed to die. Joel can do so much better.

  • oof. apparently all the staff found out via Twitter. the worst https://newspicks.us/news/1052269/

  • Michelle was equally brilliant and brutal. Netflix acts based on their data. There are other factors to consider besides data analysis though.

  • MW can say anything and the left says it comedy. Rosanne on the other hand get canned

  • What’s net flicks, and who are they cancelling. Further, was this the crook in the wh’s idea?

  • love this one