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Amazon is paying people to tweet nice things about warehouse working conditions after horror stories of staff peeing in bottles

By Tech Insider

A small army of Amazon employees are tweeting nice things about the working conditions in the company's warehouses. The Twitter accounts have a standardised format, all bearing the Amazon smile logRead full story

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  • Strikes me that Amazon is being a bit hypocritical here. They’ve been struggling to combat fake reviews on their products for years now, only to employ the same strategy in promoting their own working conditions—which by all accounts are less than stellar.

  • Doesn’t surprise me at all that Amazon would stoop to this level given how many admit that working with them is less than ideal. People who work in their warehouses are subject to crappy conditions, and if this thing about peeing in bottles is true, that’s...disgusting. Like Amazon can’t afford to pay them more. Like they can’t afford to lose out on quota standards. Jesus, treat your employees with the same decency you’re paying people to claim you treat them with. This is disgusting.

  • Amazon claims these are real people, but this is really weird. If they are legit, are they getting something out of the deal beyond "payment"? If they aren't authentic, is Amazon automating "real" responses to critical tweets? Is it a bunch of pro-Bezos Macedonian hoping to get in good with their crush?

  • Sometimes a duck is simply a duck. Occam's Razor states that, after the impossible solutions have been cut away, the simplest answer with the fewest assumptions is usually correct.

    So, I offer this: Amazon has been catching flack about working conditions. In August, they set up Twitter accounts and gave some social media savvy Fulfillment Center employees the collateral duty of engaging customers who are posting about those alleged bad Amazon working conditions.

    Doesn't that sound reasonable

    Sometimes a duck is simply a duck. Occam's Razor states that, after the impossible solutions have been cut away, the simplest answer with the fewest assumptions is usually correct.

    So, I offer this: Amazon has been catching flack about working conditions. In August, they set up Twitter accounts and gave some social media savvy Fulfillment Center employees the collateral duty of engaging customers who are posting about those alleged bad Amazon working conditions.

    Doesn't that sound reasonable, and a little less conspiracy-theoryesque than the stories posed by Tech Insider and Flamboyant Shoes Guy?

  • I’ve been moonlighting as an Amazon flex driver. Based on my experience at the fulfillment centers, the employees have been courteous but often look exhausted. I’m not sure it’s due to the size of the facilities or their work expectations. Personally, I find getting a gig that pays up to $25 an hour pretty good (but I have to track my mileage for taxes).

  • Amazon already replaced some picking process with the automation.

    I'm simply wondering what the problems really are.

  • The online product industry is mired with fake reviews to help companies with their ‘reputation management.’ The notion being that consumers tend to leave negative reviews over positive ones, skewing perception unfairly. While I know Amazon can also be gamed, I have always considered them to play fairly in the review space, letting both negative and positive reviews have equal visibility. At first this story concerned me, but is it really any different than the hundreds of other large companies who

    The online product industry is mired with fake reviews to help companies with their ‘reputation management.’ The notion being that consumers tend to leave negative reviews over positive ones, skewing perception unfairly. While I know Amazon can also be gamed, I have always considered them to play fairly in the review space, letting both negative and positive reviews have equal visibility. At first this story concerned me, but is it really any different than the hundreds of other large companies who hire student or other ambassadors to extol the positives of their brand?

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