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Governor makes California first state to eliminate bail

By Guardian (US)

New risk-assessment system, which will allow nonviolent suspects to be released within 12 hours of booking, will take effect October 2019 California will become the first state to eliminate bail foRead full story

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  • Long needed and long overdue. Who is in jail awaiting trial is almost completely based on how much money they and their family have. It needs to change.

  • You would expect but it makes sense as nearly 80% of Blacks and Hispanics who cannot make bail because of their economic situation are released eventually because they are innocent or the violations were minor and charges are dropped. We incarcerate far too many citizens and in many occasions the punishment

    You would expect but it makes sense as nearly 80% of Blacks and Hispanics who cannot make bail because of their economic situation are released eventually because they are innocent or the violations were minor and charges are dropped. We incarcerate far too many citizens and in many occasions the punishment does not fit the alleged crime.

  • Here's a novel thought...

    If you can't make bail, DON'T DO SOMETHING THAT GETS YOU ARRESTED!!!

  • Look, good political news from California of all places! The bail system serves as a foundation for many of the problems and abuses in the US justice system, effectively putting an extra penalty on the poor for being accused. The faster it's gone, the better.

  • Thank you, Governor Brown! Finally, a state that’s willing to adhere more closely to the Bill Of Rights. I’m glad I live in Oakland, CA.

  • This is very scary. On one hand bail is totally unjust and ridiculous anyway. On the other having government have complete power to decide who’s can have bail and who cannot seems like a disaster waiting to happen.

  • the 8th amendment prohibits excessive bail & I think the right to bail unless a flight risk is based on English Common Law ( may be wrong here) so the risk of long term incarceration before trial could be a real problem as it seems speedy trial (6th amend) is rarely possible anymore.

  • Doesn’t sound convincing as a solution. Too much left to local council and whatever that patchwork of enactment might become. Sounds like more frustration for the nonviolent suspects and a possible easy door for others.

  • Leaving each county’s council to determine release provisions - even based on the state Judicial councils framework - seems ripe for politicking. This ends up putting law enforcement in a constant state of change based upon who’s in office at the local level. There’s value in the concept, but too many

    Leaving each county’s council to determine release provisions - even based on the state Judicial councils framework - seems ripe for politicking. This ends up putting law enforcement in a constant state of change based upon who’s in office at the local level. There’s value in the concept, but too many details left out leaves opportunity for unintended consequences.

  • The book “Locked In” by John Pfaff is a game changer if you’re looking to become knowledgeable about the prison system and it’s horrific consequences. For California, a state with an absolutely ginormous prison population, to take this step is a big deal.

  • Nothing Jerry Brown or the Republic of CA does surprises me anymore! The overused phrase “the devil’s in the details” is certainly appropriate here. As it stands no one knows all the laws applicable for this release policy, or what kind of criminals - criminals mind you - could walk away knowing their

    Nothing Jerry Brown or the Republic of CA does surprises me anymore! The overused phrase “the devil’s in the details” is certainly appropriate here. As it stands no one knows all the laws applicable for this release policy, or what kind of criminals - criminals mind you - could walk away knowing their situation and just vanish! Maybe they’ll just keep committing “non-violent” crimes and walk every time! Too much power in too few hands too soon making tough decisions without knowing the potential effect on the public.

    The 1 comment I’ve read that I totally agree with is if you don’t want to pay bail, don’t commit a crime!

    The next 2-3 years AFTER the policy goes active will be very interesting!

  • Wow this is amazing, holding people too often results in the accused pleading so they can be released. When you think of being held you go to remember that person has responsibilities and could result in loss of work, children or anything. This is a long overdue reform.

  • Absolutely fantastic new view on the system. This will really take away the fact of having money meaning you can get away with more. This allows for a much more uniformed and fair system for all, as long as it IS used properly. I see the concern some have over the idea of judges having so much power

    Absolutely fantastic new view on the system. This will really take away the fact of having money meaning you can get away with more. This allows for a much more uniformed and fair system for all, as long as it IS used properly. I see the concern some have over the idea of judges having so much power and dangerous criminals leaving and not coming back. We will just have to wait and see, and if it works, hopefully more states and other countries will be willing to embrace this change!

  • Perhaps the greater challenge that will face the California judicial system now will be the trial/plea bargaining process. This entire process results in NO speedy trial and unconstitutional incarceration. Trials are expensive. Incarceration is federally funded and jails have become profitable for many

    Perhaps the greater challenge that will face the California judicial system now will be the trial/plea bargaining process. This entire process results in NO speedy trial and unconstitutional incarceration. Trials are expensive. Incarceration is federally funded and jails have become profitable for many, if not every county in the country.

  • In my opinion, this is a terrible idea. Even nonviolent criminals could either skip town or commit another crime.

  • Great step toward a more just system.

  • Economics should have no basis in determining flight risk or continued criminality......minor crimes 12 hours.....major crime......no bail. I am sure a lot of Californians will sleep better knowing the bad guys are not back on the street after committing a major felony just because they have money or

    Economics should have no basis in determining flight risk or continued criminality......minor crimes 12 hours.....major crime......no bail. I am sure a lot of Californians will sleep better knowing the bad guys are not back on the street after committing a major felony just because they have money or a high powered attorney! Good move California!

  • Novel idea, make fewer things crimes and we will see fewer people arrested. Victimless crimes are a real thing.

    The fear I have with this kind of legislation is that although it may unclog the system and allow for nonviolent criminals and innocent to live free until trial the flee risk for violent criminals is palpable.

  • "The bill will replace bail with a risk-assessment system, although it’s still unclear how the system will work." Ahhhh, government... We don't know how the replacement will work, but do it anyway!

  • Yes. absolutely! Many thanks, Gov. Jerry Brown!! Brilliant, reserved, compassionate! My kind of man!!!

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