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The Latest Beach Villain: Sue at Your Own Risk

The Latest Beach Villain: Sue at Your Own Risk

Read more on The New York Times

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  • What a great story. Bowles nails it with the phrase 'peculiar perfectionism.' This is what makes people like Khosla and Zuckerberg so good at building industry-leading companies but so bad at thinking through the societal implications of their actions. They not only miss the forest for the trees—if they're

    What a great story. Bowles nails it with the phrase 'peculiar perfectionism.' This is what makes people like Khosla and Zuckerberg so good at building industry-leading companies but so bad at thinking through the societal implications of their actions. They not only miss the forest for the trees—if they're being completely honest, they probably don't really care that much about the forest. Khosla all but says it himself.

  • Read the article for yourself, but this sounds like the argument of a person trying to control who is allowed to walk, stand, loiter, on the sidewalk in front of their home. Then I just got angry because I stopped and read this article, because of this part:

    (Excerpt from nytimes.com article, below

    Read the article for yourself, but this sounds like the argument of a person trying to control who is allowed to walk, stand, loiter, on the sidewalk in front of their home. Then I just got angry because I stopped and read this article, because of this part:

    (Excerpt from nytimes.com article, below)

    Mr. Khosla says he does not even want to triumph. “If I were to ever win in the Supreme Court, I’d be depressed about it,” he says. “I support the Coastal Act; I don’t want to weaken it by winning. But property rights are even more important.”

    He does not want the beach at all, really. He does not swim. For fun, he hikes.

    “I mean, look, to be honest, I do wish I’d never bought the property,” Mr. Khosla says. “In the end, I’m going to end up selling it.”

    “If this hadn’t ever started, I’d be so happy,” he adds. “But once you’re there in principle, you can’t give up principle.” He frames the struggle in the Silicon Valley patois of contrarianism. “I’d rather do the right hard things now that I’m in,” he says, “than the wrong easy things.”

    (Close excerpt from nytimes.com article.)

    What a truly aletiest thing to say, "I'm going to clog the system, based on what I determine as principal".

  • This must be a relative of the very rich asshole who wanted, so badly, to have have the Mt. Soledad cross removed, in San Diego. And, now, this guy is following in the footsteps of the government, who took the patio property away from the residence whose homes are, now, literally, just a few feet from

    This must be a relative of the very rich asshole who wanted, so badly, to have have the Mt. Soledad cross removed, in San Diego. And, now, this guy is following in the footsteps of the government, who took the patio property away from the residence whose homes are, now, literally, just a few feet from the boardwalk. Money rules all 🖕

  • Just another rich asshole who wants something their way. All coastal waters should embrace what we have here in Hawaii, public access to all beaches up to the high water line.

  • The story is a bit more nuanced than the title seems to suggest.