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Zack Rosebrugh

Good evening.

Impeachment updates

A legal expert explains the “smoking gun” in the impeachment probe. The key piece of evidence in president Trump's impeachment inquiry—the July 25 call—has already been out for months. Robert Litt, a former general counsel to the Director of National Intelligence, explains why it’s so important.

The “smoking gun” in the Trump impeachment inquiry explained

As lawmakers take testimony from eight witnesses in the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump's Ukraine dealings this week, key details threaten to get lost in the deluge of information and political spin.

I spoke to a national security expert who advises staying focused on the July 25 phone call between

As lawmakers take testimony from eight witnesses in the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump's Ukraine dealings this week, key details threaten to get lost in the deluge of information and political spin.

I spoke to a national security expert who advises staying focused on the July 25 phone call between the US and Ukrainian presidents and the way the Trump administration handled it. By storing the call record on a server with highly restricted access and following an unusual process for compiling and editing the "transcript," the administration's actions speak louder than its vociferous denials of wrongdoing.

Unicorn hunting

The youth vote

A new study shows young US voters are really bad at spotting fake news. High school students who were shown a grainy video in which poll workers appear to stuff ballots concluded that it provided “strong evidence” of voter fraud in the 2016 Democratic primaries. It had actually been shot in Russia.

A new Stanford study shows young US 2020 voters are really bad at spotting fake news

Getting rid of online misinformation and its many pitfalls will require more than observations, statements or complains. Instead, new social media must be developed with inherent tools to deal with misinformation vigorously. Also, the role of scientists in this fight should not be overlooked since they

Getting rid of online misinformation and its many pitfalls will require more than observations, statements or complains. Instead, new social media must be developed with inherent tools to deal with misinformation vigorously. Also, the role of scientists in this fight should not be overlooked since they are among the best equipped to take part in this battle.

Cultivating resilience

The human brain is the most resilient organ in the body. Understanding how most brains maintain youthful plasticity could lead scientists to figure out why some don't.

How the human brain stays young even as we age

As a health reporter, I think a lot about what happens when aging goes awry in the brain, leading to dementias. Dementia is tragic, and thankfully only happens to about 8% of older adults.

But here’s a plot twist: scientists are still figuring out what typical aging looks like in the brain! The brain

As a health reporter, I think a lot about what happens when aging goes awry in the brain, leading to dementias. Dementia is tragic, and thankfully only happens to about 8% of older adults.

But here’s a plot twist: scientists are still figuring out what typical aging looks like in the brain! The brain is arguably the most dynamic organ in our whole bodies, and it changes over time to accommodate wear and tear so our mental faculties don’t slow down. How they do this is still a mystery! I loved exploring some of the research and theories for this piece.

Hong Kong protests

Mining for silver

The future of work

In the age of burnout, how do companies keep their employees coming back? As workplaces become more flexible about leaves and sabbaticals, managing the return to the office is becoming a business in its own right.

In the age of burnout, how companies keep their employees coming back

We normally keep the personal out of our professional lives at work—but burnout has gotten so bad it's impossible to ignore. Teaching workers resilience can keep them in the workplace for longer if they can learn to cope with major life changes on top of evolving employment.

ETFs are eating the market

Environmental concerns

Spotify's podcast ambitions

Spotify wants to treat podcasts like music playlists. If 'Your Daily Podcasts' expedite discovery, that would be a win for listeners and hosts alike. But Spotify will have to prove it can turn up more gems than sludge.

Spotify wants to treat podcasts like music playlists

The biggest problem with podcasts is not finding them. It is, for the ones that grow a story over time, listening from episode 1. And even ones where you could listen from now assume you have listened from episode 1, so you still can’t just start from today.....

The African market

Gaming's next frontier

Virtual reality is too boring. Fast Company writes that developers haven’t given us a good enough reason to leave our own realities behind in favor of their artificial worlds.

The big problem with virtual reality? It’s almost as boring as real life

I feel like this article only focuses on the enterprise applications of VR, which of course are not for everyday people. In the wake of Valve announcing their first flagship VR game, Alyx, this article is incredibly narrow.

Thanks for keeping it real.

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OxyContin Maker Offers Free Opioid Therapy in Legal Talks

OxyContin Maker Offers Free Opioid Therapy in Legal Talks

Read more on Bloomberg

From Our Members

  • I agree with both of the UK law professor’s comments. This is a savvy negotiating tool and it does do something to address the underlying problems delineated in the pending litigation.

    However, what Purdue should do is make this drug available to every community. Because they sure made OxyContin available

    I agree with both of the UK law professor’s comments. This is a savvy negotiating tool and it does do something to address the underlying problems delineated in the pending litigation.

    However, what Purdue should do is make this drug available to every community. Because they sure made OxyContin available to every community and every demographic.

  • This is an example of a news article that gets addiction science wrong in the first statement. Buprenorphine is used as a long term medication to stabilize cravings and urges to use caused by the disorder. This kind of reporting, as well-intended as it often is continues the stigma and perpetuates misunderstanding

    This is an example of a news article that gets addiction science wrong in the first statement. Buprenorphine is used as a long term medication to stabilize cravings and urges to use caused by the disorder. This kind of reporting, as well-intended as it often is continues the stigma and perpetuates misunderstanding about addiction. A google search will turn up the American Society of Addiction Medicine webpage.

  • Ok, so anyone that knows me knows this sort of thing is very near and dear to my heart. 1st. why isn’t anyone holding the government responsible? Isn’t the fda the ones who are suppose to minimize this kind of thing? Isn’t that why you cannot use marijuana in most states because it’s proven harmful or

    Ok, so anyone that knows me knows this sort of thing is very near and dear to my heart. 1st. why isn’t anyone holding the government responsible? Isn’t the fda the ones who are suppose to minimize this kind of thing? Isn’t that why you cannot use marijuana in most states because it’s proven harmful or a public menace? Yet we constantly see big pharma get a pass on the mass amount of addictions caused by their drugs, nasty side effects and sometimes even deaths caused by these drugs. I mean sure they have to pay out massive amounts of payouts but with the only industry that allows for 5000% markups and with the most lobbyists and spending in Washington (by a billion) and the only industry where the government doesn’t negotiate price it’s clear what’s going on. I digress. 2nd anyone that takes an opioid and doesn’t understand or know the side effect. That being highly addictive probably shouldn’t be allowed to use it. Vietnam saw what was it? 75-80% of soldiers come back addicted to heroin or opioids. Yeah there’s a reason for that. In short let’s blame everything and everyone for a much bigger issue but such is America’s biggest downfall.

  • That’s nice they want to give out free replacement drugs. But, it shouldn’t lessen a big settlement. This is a huge problem that has decimated entire communities and damaged a generation of people. Not to mention the enormous costs to come for all the children of addicts. I live in a place hugely affected

    That’s nice they want to give out free replacement drugs. But, it shouldn’t lessen a big settlement. This is a huge problem that has decimated entire communities and damaged a generation of people. Not to mention the enormous costs to come for all the children of addicts. I live in a place hugely affected by this and it’s incredibly sad to see ghosts walking around my community. Our elementary schools are full of children of addicts who need so many services schools aren’t equipped to give. Shame on Purdue. They did this. They told doctors and the public it was NON-addictive. They lied. The damages are catastrophic. Make them pay. I’m sure people will benefit from free replacement drugs, but come on. Most people will have to be on those replacement drugs for the rest of their lives. Nice way to keep people buying your products. They own the patent for the OxyContin AND the drug you have to take forever to quit? Sounds pretty shady to me.

  • In my community, methadone is just as big of a problem as opioids. This seems like just another drug with potential for abuse. It's a bandaid

  • Very great way for big pharma to make bigger money off the weak and addicted...Lookie there! Another drug on the market to misuse! Just like methadone. Since it’s labeled as a treatment, people will turn a blind eye to the epidemic over said “Treatment” while they watch the decline in opioid use. Even

    Very great way for big pharma to make bigger money off the weak and addicted...Lookie there! Another drug on the market to misuse! Just like methadone. Since it’s labeled as a treatment, people will turn a blind eye to the epidemic over said “Treatment” while they watch the decline in opioid use. Even if the treatment is non-addictive (which who really knows whether it would be a mental or physical addiction?!?) it will be used for off-label/recreational purposes other than its intended use. Stats are stats...yes the opioid numbers will decline...but how do we record stats f the people who are just as addicted to the treatment? Oh! The treatment is not an opioid so problem solved! GO ‘Merica!

    No matter how fierce the FDA is with regulations on Doctors, there is no way to test integrity, and unfortunately the doctors who HAVE integrity won’t prescribe opioids out of fear...leaving the people who DO need them...SHIT OUT OF LUCK!

  • Good

  • glad to see this