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No Cash Needed At This Cafe. Students Pay The Tab With Their Personal Data

No Cash Needed At This Cafe. Students Pay The Tab With Their Personal Data

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Contributions

  • Interesting. Here’s a new take on using your data ... you get something for it and they’re overt about how they’re going to leverage it for others (eg companies). Is this better? Is this the future?

    I’m told that when you check in at a hotel you’re willing to give up some basic info to access free

    Interesting. Here’s a new take on using your data ... you get something for it and they’re overt about how they’re going to leverage it for others (eg companies). Is this better? Is this the future?

    I’m told that when you check in at a hotel you’re willing to give up some basic info to access free wifi. Is this like that?

    There will always be those that hold their privacy dear and others who just assume they’re giving it away anyways.

  • I’m with a few pickers on this one. Give away things to try from sponsors and the coffee shop will have to turn students away because of occupancy restrictions. Seems like a better way for students to feel good about giving away some soft data, and it makes them a greater part of the project by turning

    I’m with a few pickers on this one. Give away things to try from sponsors and the coffee shop will have to turn students away because of occupancy restrictions. Seems like a better way for students to feel good about giving away some soft data, and it makes them a greater part of the project by turning them into influencers on productization and design decisions.

  • “She doesn't think she has seen a single customer refuse to give up the data.”

    This is actually not surprising to me. It shows how little my generation cares about privacy in the big data era. My question is what monetary value is this establishment putting on this personal information? A Starbucks habit

    “She doesn't think she has seen a single customer refuse to give up the data.”

    This is actually not surprising to me. It shows how little my generation cares about privacy in the big data era. My question is what monetary value is this establishment putting on this personal information? A Starbucks habit could cost as much as $300 /semester, but is this a fair price for data, and how is that determined?

  • Short term reward for selling your privacy over the many decades ahead of you. One part savvy business model; one part dystopian fiction come true.

  • Oh I don’t believe that last bit for a second. Obviously they are going to sell this info and I’ve no doubt these students signed something allowing the business to do so. I’m not offering an opinion as to good/bad. It’s up to each person to decide what personal info they wish to use as barter.

    I will

    Oh I don’t believe that last bit for a second. Obviously they are going to sell this info and I’ve no doubt these students signed something allowing the business to do so. I’m not offering an opinion as to good/bad. It’s up to each person to decide what personal info they wish to use as barter.

    I will say in response to another comment that the value (monetarily) of any thing is what someone else pays for it.

  • It will be interesting to see how this plays out. Will these students have a better concept of critical vs general data, get burned over a misuse, or simply have a college story to tell over a failed idea?

  • This isn’t a good idea at all. It is a slippery slope which I doubt can be managed appropriately even if the owners/administrators have the best of intentions. This environment is ripe for abuse. I can almost guaranty they sell their data (if not now they will in the future) to other organizations? The

    This isn’t a good idea at all. It is a slippery slope which I doubt can be managed appropriately even if the owners/administrators have the best of intentions. This environment is ripe for abuse. I can almost guaranty they sell their data (if not now they will in the future) to other organizations? The data collected will be available forever. Do they also collect behavioral data? What if they figure out there is a correlation between someone who eats a lot of a certain thing (ie. Too much sugar) and some kind of health risk (ie. Likelihood to become diabetic) and if the insurance companies get this data, they may refuse to cover those students likely to need expensive care. Companies may even refuse to hire someone who they know does not meet their profile of an ideal employee. Do they keep track of students who smoke? Are their grades made available? what if the student has a bad year? Will it haunt them? I bet it will. It’s possible the student may have a good experience which comes from this but, over 40 years, I can almost guarantee the data collected will ultimately have a negative impact on these students. Someone needs to protect these kids. I’m sure glad I was not the person who signed off on this at brown university... I don’t think it will be viewed as a ‘smart’ move and history will not be kind to those who had the responsibility to protect. Our society is on a collision course with privacy and data collection ethics.

  • I’d say I care about this, but this is a consenting generation when it comes to data, this place has decency to tell you they want your data! So kudos to them

  • Fascinating

  • Maybe "order habit" information can be used for the recruits?😂