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Use of the internet and smartphones is no longer on the rise in America

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Contributions

  • Edna Rein. “Over fifties”? Need I remind you that it is the “over fifties” who created computer language, hardware, and the internet. How soon little whipper snappers forget!

  • With high levels of saturation in the US, clearly the real growth to be gained is outside the US--with the 50% of people globally who don't have Internet access and the one third of adults that still don't have mobile phones.

  • I will disagree about being over 50 not comfortable using a smartphone. I am at Wal-Mart sitting outside waiting my my groceries I ordered on my Wal-Mart grocery app. I checked in with my app on my smartphone.

  • "There’s also the population over 50 years old, which often complains that learning a new technology isn’t worth their time."

    I don't get this mentality. With life expectancies on the rise, people in their fifties could have another thirty years of living in this world. Why would you choose to remain

    "There’s also the population over 50 years old, which often complains that learning a new technology isn’t worth their time."

    I don't get this mentality. With life expectancies on the rise, people in their fifties could have another thirty years of living in this world. Why would you choose to remain ill equipped to navigate it? My in-laws refuse to get a computer or use the internet because they don't want to take the time to learn how to use it. But they complain about time wasted driving to businesses to find out they're closed, or to a store only to find out the item they want isnt stocked there.

    Internet and technology companies would do well to not give up on this target demographic, but rather work to find a way to appeal to them.

  • In the case of cell phones and the internet, less is more: less online shopping and more community oriented shopping ethics; less texting/msgs and more actual in person conversations; less self focus and distraction, and more awareness of surroundings and other people.

    Many adults have low to no need

    In the case of cell phones and the internet, less is more: less online shopping and more community oriented shopping ethics; less texting/msgs and more actual in person conversations; less self focus and distraction, and more awareness of surroundings and other people.

    Many adults have low to no need to be connected all times, and can wait till they get home to see pictures of their grandchildren, watch the news, or use facebook. They have cellphones as tools. So older generations don't have a requirement or need for this constant distraction.

    It is very sad how the younger generations are so heavily addicted to and reliant on their phones. People in their 40s and older still remember and usually actively participate in face to face discussions with people actually around them. A lost artform.

  • At some point, there has to be a limit to how many people want smartphones. I didn't get one for years simply because I didn't want to be online all the time. Finally caved, and now look at me go. Online at NewsPicks again haha. Too convenient, maybe some people want to be left offline.

  • We have to be careful of how we define “internet use”, because there are two major categories that touch consumers: “recreational” (Facebook, phone screen-time etc) and internet based services (think online bill pay or Uber). From what I can tell, the Pew study focuses on recreational use of internet

    We have to be careful of how we define “internet use”, because there are two major categories that touch consumers: “recreational” (Facebook, phone screen-time etc) and internet based services (think online bill pay or Uber). From what I can tell, the Pew study focuses on recreational use of internet in the US - which I agree has reached a saturation point. All the latest ideas in recreational games/activities have fallen flat in the US because who has time?

    But internet based services have much room to grow in the US. In many respects we’re behind Africa and East Asia for things like digital pay and online services saturation. How many people over 50 do you know that still write checks to the water company every month? That’s the remaining “internet” market in the US

  • With the rise of 5G, the use of the internet will increase by a quatitive amount. The internet will be much faster and more commonly used. Everyone will see and want to use the internet for the benefits. The use of the internet has stalled for now. The problem I see is, when 5G comes online. Will our infrastructure be ready?

  • Not everyone wants a smartphone or to use the internet. Everyone who wants to use smartphones and the internet either already has a smartphone and the internet or they’re too poor for a smartphone and the internet. The only things that could up that are time (over time there will likely be less and less

    Not everyone wants a smartphone or to use the internet. Everyone who wants to use smartphones and the internet either already has a smartphone and the internet or they’re too poor for a smartphone and the internet. The only things that could up that are time (over time there will likely be less and less people that don’t want smartphones) and an economy where workers are properly paid (there would be less people too poor for a smartphone or the internet). This shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise.

  • Seeing the data source linked from the article, it seems that almost all people who are 18-49 years old use the Internet. Also it is not related to neither education nor income.

    From a viewpoint of equal opportunities, it is awesome.