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Mexican troops are in the streets to fight the drug war, and the country's defense chief says legalization may be 'a way out'

By Business Insider

Mexico's defense minister said Friday that legalization could be a solution to the problem of drug-related violence in the country's southwest. Officials in Mexico have already pushed for legalizatRead full story

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  • I get the desire to try something new - anything -- to cut down on the bloodshed. But it's far from a sure thing that if drugs were legalized in Mexico, that would magically create more order among the cartels and reduce the extraordinary levels of violence. It's entirely possible that the more dominant

    I get the desire to try something new - anything -- to cut down on the bloodshed. But it's far from a sure thing that if drugs were legalized in Mexico, that would magically create more order among the cartels and reduce the extraordinary levels of violence. It's entirely possible that the more dominant cartels would just get even more pervasive and powerful with drug distribution, and that they'd simply find new illegal businesses to build out, and that even more violence would spiral out from those new 'industries.'

    I think it's a general culture of lawlessness that's the problem, rather than drugs per se.

  • This has been floated by AMLO previously but it seems like there would be an underlying governance problem— especially in big opium territories like Guerrero— around farmer security and making sure supply chains are legitimate end to end. Also, Colombia shows that state de-escalation with powerful, drug-trading

    This has been floated by AMLO previously but it seems like there would be an underlying governance problem— especially in big opium territories like Guerrero— around farmer security and making sure supply chains are legitimate end to end. Also, Colombia shows that state de-escalation with powerful, drug-trading parastate groups is no easy feat.

  • Just got back from 5 days in Monterrey Mexico. It's a large city in the North with great wealth and its share of violence. Great trip. I don't want to be Pollyanna, I have read that last year had the highest ever number of murders in Mexico. Obviously, there are serious problems.

    But I want to provide

    Just got back from 5 days in Monterrey Mexico. It's a large city in the North with great wealth and its share of violence. Great trip. I don't want to be Pollyanna, I have read that last year had the highest ever number of murders in Mexico. Obviously, there are serious problems.

    But I want to provide a positive data point amidst a sea of bad news. We moved freely at day and night without any problems, would hate to see Mexico suffer more because of this awful violence. And for what it's worth, the peso is unbelievably cheap against the USD right now. I stayed in a Novotel for under $100/night.

  • Nothing else seems to work BUT I do not think the cartels will go quietly. Too much money involved.

  • Legalization might help a lot of farmers in Mexico and give them a legitimate way of life creating the raw material for the Mexican government to make opium and other medical advances. But I think for the most part the violence will continue because the market is so lucrative across the border to the

    Legalization might help a lot of farmers in Mexico and give them a legitimate way of life creating the raw material for the Mexican government to make opium and other medical advances. But I think for the most part the violence will continue because the market is so lucrative across the border to the US. It may decrease violence in Mexico itself but they have such an incentive to bring the drugs to market in the US they might continue fighting over access to the US market and as the article said the individual farmers are still in danger from armed goons and thugs taking their crops.

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