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Millennials are ditching primary care doctors

By Axios Health

First they came for chain restaurants, then golf, and now millennials are turning their backs on another old institution: primary care. Younger patients are increasingly turning away from primary cRead full story

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  • Everyone that I know in my college town who does not have a primary care doctor doesn’t have one because they don’t have insurance and therefore do not see a doctor on a regular basis. That is why they use walk in clinics. We can’t afford regular health care and we can’t afford the prices of nearly anything

    Everyone that I know in my college town who does not have a primary care doctor doesn’t have one because they don’t have insurance and therefore do not see a doctor on a regular basis. That is why they use walk in clinics. We can’t afford regular health care and we can’t afford the prices of nearly anything health care related. We go when we are absolutely forced to and we choose the cheapest option even if it isn’t the most effective. This isn’t a choice millennials are choosing to make to boycott the system- it the ONLY choice we have and that is essentially being made by someone else. The system has boycotted us.

  • I worked as a neuropsychiatric assistant on a premed track many lives ago until I realized it wasn’t for me. I like solving problems and there are simply too many losses in medicine to deal with in a lifetime.

    Growing up in a small town my doctor would call the entire family to come in for preventative

    I worked as a neuropsychiatric assistant on a premed track many lives ago until I realized it wasn’t for me. I like solving problems and there are simply too many losses in medicine to deal with in a lifetime.

    Growing up in a small town my doctor would call the entire family to come in for preventative care checkups. No one does this anymore, they don’t want to see you unless there is a problem and if there is a problem their hands are tied on how proactively they can address it.

    If I never called my primary care physician he would have no idea I existed. It’s become an uncaring practice, and people are picking clinics and urgent care because there is no defining difference between seeing a complete stranger or your primary care physician other than you can get in faster with the former.

  • This is a story about nothing. 18 to 29 year olds have never been good about primary care because they have little need for it. The bigger story here is recognizing the truth: urgent care is expensive, wasteful, and tends to produce worse outcomes than primary care. The challenge is figuring out how

    This is a story about nothing. 18 to 29 year olds have never been good about primary care because they have little need for it. The bigger story here is recognizing the truth: urgent care is expensive, wasteful, and tends to produce worse outcomes than primary care. The challenge is figuring out how to absorb these acute care visits into the primary care system and educate people on preventative health care.

  • “First they came for chain restaurants...” Ugh. Anyways.

    As a fellow young person who works in healthcare and deals with communicating with insurance patients regarding their need for a PCP, I can understand this. When it comes to young people, we're dealing with normally healthy people, who only really

    “First they came for chain restaurants...” Ugh. Anyways.

    As a fellow young person who works in healthcare and deals with communicating with insurance patients regarding their need for a PCP, I can understand this. When it comes to young people, we're dealing with normally healthy people, who only really want to see a doctor when something comes up. It can be a pain to establish yourself as a patient with a PCP, and even when you do, you may not find the need to see them as regularly as other people do.

    That being said, it's absolutely a problem. There's certainly a large number of young people who will let symptoms of conditions go unaddressed. Having a persistent ear infection that keeps returning after every dose of antibiotics is finished isn’t normal, and yet they’ll go to the same urgent care for the same results every time. I can say this because I finally had an urgent care doctor notice the trend in my ear infection and discover that I had a blockage in my Eustachian tubes. Somehow nasal spray & not a constant overload of antibiotics ended up being my ultimate solution.

    It all boils down to convenience, and I know it’s hard for some to see, but navigating through the world as a young person feels different now for so many of us. It feels like time is clustered and limited, especially for those of us who work excessively or go to school or both. I really don’t feel that this was uncommon in young people from generations before us, either.

  • I would like to have my daughters kept being seen by the doctors who know them since when they were babies, as long as we stay in one place.

  • Most young people ditch their PCH’s. It is in their nature. But as they age, that will change.

  • Managed care is the worst thing that has ever happened to our primary care physicians. You don’t know you need any kind of relationship with a primary care doctor until you get older and have health problems. Then, having been the patient of a doctor who has known you most of your life, pays off. I grew

    Managed care is the worst thing that has ever happened to our primary care physicians. You don’t know you need any kind of relationship with a primary care doctor until you get older and have health problems. Then, having been the patient of a doctor who has known you most of your life, pays off. I grew up in a small town where the doctor who delivered me attended my wedding. I miss the medicine of the old days. Even though we know so much more now, I miss the comfort which came with knowing your doctor cares about you personally and I would switch back to the old days of medicine if I could.

  • Although the medical system in the US is different from my country,some similarities are found.

    Busy work enviroment blocks most people from being aware of the importance of health checkup.

    Also medical checkup are perceived negatively such as time consuming,the painful examination and so on.

    Different

    Although the medical system in the US is different from my country,some similarities are found.

    Busy work enviroment blocks most people from being aware of the importance of health checkup.

    Also medical checkup are perceived negatively such as time consuming,the painful examination and so on.

    Different approach is needed to encourage people to do the regular checkup.

    Nobody knows what happend to themselves tomorrow.

  • Only Millennials?? Ha. When I am required by U.S. insurance to get charged for every little reason I have for going to a doctor, and that doctor is likely to just refer me to a specialist, whom I also have to pay, I'm not starting with the Primary Care Doc. This isn't rocket science.

  • I mean for most people who are young, don’t have a chronic illness, or aren’t required by their health insurer or work to get a yearly checkup, this makes sense. Most primary care visits seem like an unnecessary burden, mainly because a lot of people don’t see the value in it. If primary care doctors

    I mean for most people who are young, don’t have a chronic illness, or aren’t required by their health insurer or work to get a yearly checkup, this makes sense. Most primary care visits seem like an unnecessary burden, mainly because a lot of people don’t see the value in it. If primary care doctors are really struggling they ought to put effort into educating consumers and making themselves more accessible. I go once a year and it’s always a all day affair.

  • And, amazingly enough, there's are still chain restaurants. And golf courses.

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