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CEO corner

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO. The company has been investing heavily in tech and data analytics. It sees its new CEO leading it into a future focused on data-driven, direct-to-consumer sales.

Why Nike selected a tech executive as its next CEO

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why

"Parker, who has been Nike's CEO since 2006 and has worked at the company for four decades, will become the company's executive chairman, according to the press release."

This is one of the most important parts; Nike needed Parker in some sort of capacity after he steps down as CEO for 13 years.

Why?

Because Parker steered the company through countless potential disasters, from the gender discrimination mess in 2018 and the Kaepernick campaign backlash to their disservice to pregnant athletes. He didn't just address them; he fixed the problems, wiped out the bad actors, and managed to TRIPLE sales.

Parker is a heck of an architect.

Money, money, money

Live from the International Astronautical Congress

The business of travel

Marking 30 years of the web

The latest on Brexit

WeWork gets worse

SoftBank takes over WeWork. The board of the shared office company chose the Japanese conglomerate over a competing offer from JP Morgan, the Wall Street Journal reports. Co-founder Adam Neumann will lose control of WeWork—but get a $1.7 billion payout.

SoftBank to Boost Stake in WeWork in Deal That Cuts Most Ties With Neumann

Being a big fan of WeWork’s service, it is sad to see the devaluation hitting this level. Moreover, the payout to Adam N is beyond silly for a company that is going to need a major structural face lift.

WeWork is really a true unicorn: a creature that only was viable in the mind of Adam Neumann...

While I believe it might be possible to make the business model work through a greater focus on corporate customers, the governance and hubris on the company’s leadership and greedy backers quickly contributed

WeWork is really a true unicorn: a creature that only was viable in the mind of Adam Neumann...

While I believe it might be possible to make the business model work through a greater focus on corporate customers, the governance and hubris on the company’s leadership and greedy backers quickly contributed to unrealistic valuations.

And now SoftBank will have to live with the creature it helped create...

India's coal addiction

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet. Quartz explores how India is meeting the challenge of providing increasing amounts of energy to its people while trying to lower its dependence on fossil fuels. ✦

India’s hard push on renewables isn’t about climate change—yet

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular

Unlike the rest of the anglophilic world—Canada, the US, Australia, and the UK—India has never encountered a significant culture of climate-change denial. But the awareness of climate change in India hasn’t been high either. So the rise of renewables in India, which has been nothing short of spectacular, has other motivations: from energy security to soft power.

Making immigration work

Time to get lost in a museum...

New York's MoMA has reopened and it's a whole new experience. After the 90-year old institution’s $450-million expansion, it’s now possible to get lost at the new “mega MoMA.” That’s a good thing.

It’s now possible to get lost at the new “mega MoMA.” That’s a good thing

MoMA used to be my favorite museum in New York and now it's my favorite by a long shot. Aside from a few placings that feel designed for content creation (👀 surrealist section), this expansion is forward-thinking and inspired.

... and come back soon

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Saudis Smother Dissent, Unleashing Troll Army and Twitter Insider

Saudis Smother Dissent, Unleashing Troll Army and Twitter Insider

Read more on The New York Times

From Our Members

  • Silicon Valley companies infused with funding from the region need to examine how they might have been infiltrated.

  • What is our integrity and values as a country worth? A Lockheed Martin contract?

  • We are not dependent upon Saudi Arabia for energy anymore. This situation then begs the question: Why are we so afraid of taking the obvious moral stand and condemning their litany of human rights violations?

  • They buried what appears to be a big scandal in the very last paragraphs of the article:

    "In a nine-page report, a copy of which was obtained by The Times, McKinsey found that the measures received twice as much coverage on Twitter than in the country’s traditional news media or blogs, and that negative

    They buried what appears to be a big scandal in the very last paragraphs of the article:

    "In a nine-page report, a copy of which was obtained by The Times, McKinsey found that the measures received twice as much coverage on Twitter than in the country’s traditional news media or blogs, and that negative sentiment far outweighed positive reactions on social media.

    Three people were driving the conversation on Twitter, the firm found: writer Khalid al-Alkami; Abdulaziz, the young dissident living in Canada; and an anonymous user who went by Ahmad.

    After the report was issued, Alkami was arrested, the human rights group ALQST said. Abdulaziz said that Saudi government officials imprisoned two of his brothers and hacked his cellphone, an account supported by a researcher at Citizen Lab. Ahmad, the anonymous account, was shut down."

    tl:dr Saudis paid McKinsey to identify biggest online dissidents. McKinsey hands over the report. Next thing you know they're all in jail or worse,

  • Should we have ever trusted this scandolous ancient-run nation? Now that America is #1 in oil again they arent so worried about our dependence on them.

  • There should be laws against what McKinsey has done. They say they were ‘appalled’ to find out a list they generated was used to imprison the people on that list... what did they think was going to happen? McKinsey is as guilty as anyone in this story. They should face public and legal backlash. They

    There should be laws against what McKinsey has done. They say they were ‘appalled’ to find out a list they generated was used to imprison the people on that list... what did they think was going to happen? McKinsey is as guilty as anyone in this story. They should face public and legal backlash. They knew what they were doing... just like google knows what it is doing with China (these are very similar stories)... I wish the American corporations would spend their time on ‘clean’ business. The ‘good guys’ have plenty of clean business for them to focus on. Why are they compelled to ‘deal with the devil’? I can’t imagine the circumstances behind a potentially business shattering decision like this. Why?