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Ana Kova

Good evening.

Washington at home and abroad

The next G7 will be held at a Trump resort. The White House announced the 2020 summit will take place at Trump National Doral golf resort near Miami, Reuters reports.

Trump will host G7 summit next year at one of his own properties: White House official

As we reported last month, if any other federal employee were to make this deal, they would likely be prosecuted: https://qz.com/1706517/trumps-bid-to-bring-g7-to-his-doral-resort-is-probably-illegal/

Allowing this to happen flies in the face of the Emoluments Clause. I don't care if they make you believe it will save money. His Doral property, like a lot of his properties, aren't doing well, and having taxpayers pay to bail out his properties is insanity.

It doesn't matter if it's done at cost

Allowing this to happen flies in the face of the Emoluments Clause. I don't care if they make you believe it will save money. His Doral property, like a lot of his properties, aren't doing well, and having taxpayers pay to bail out his properties is insanity.

It doesn't matter if it's done at cost. This is still using federal dollars to keep his properties above water. It's all he cares about. If you don't believe me, when was the last time he talked about the GLWA? Or Feral Hogs invading new states? Or fires out west? Only when he thinks it averts attention to something else he doesn't want to talk about.

The optics here don’t look good. Mulvaney may say that it’s being held at cost but unless they open up the books why must we believe them. More than anything this is an endorsement of any leader who uses their position to profit and that has long term ramifications.

How can you know which Trump impeachment polls to believe? As with all polling, the results depend to some extent on who is polled, what they are asked, and when.

How to know which Trump impeachment polls to believe

Here’s what this comes down to:

(1). Is national support for impeachment and removal north of 70%?

(2). Is GOP support north of 50%?

(3). Support for impeachment in the key Senate races in 2020.

(4). Data on whether Congressional Republicans are better off with Trump at the top of the ticket or

Here’s what this comes down to:

(1). Is national support for impeachment and removal north of 70%?

(2). Is GOP support north of 50%?

(3). Support for impeachment in the key Senate races in 2020.

(4). Data on whether Congressional Republicans are better off with Trump at the top of the ticket or someone else (like Romney).

This is a mathematical question and nothing else.

Facebucks 2.0

Facebook’s payments strategy isn’t Libra, it’s WhatsApp. Mark Zuckerberg hopes to test WhatsApp Pay in Mexico before the end of 2019. The ramifications are far more realistic than Libra's theoretical impact on US monetary policy—and they would affect users worldwide.

Facebook’s payments strategy isn’t Libra, it’s WhatsApp

If you look at Asian messaging platforms like WeChat or Line, they look far more successful for being payment solutions. Facebook Messenger didn't make it in the ​US.

American tech companies seem eager to go to South America for testing their financial solutions (Due to the small number of people having

If you look at Asian messaging platforms like WeChat or Line, they look far more successful for being payment solutions. Facebook Messenger didn't make it in the ​US.

American tech companies seem eager to go to South America for testing their financial solutions (Due to the small number of people having access to a bank, lower than the US). With WhatsApp's presence in Brazil and other South American countries, Facebook's bet on WhatsApp as payments strategy looks way more logical than Visa-betrayed Libra.

Facebook's Libra has won all the headlines recently. But over the last couple years, it's been WhatsApp that's quietly pioneered payments in India. Facebook is looking to go international with WhatsApp Pay.

The new TV

Shut it down

Brexit deal reached

The EU and the UK agreed on a Brexit deal, but there are many hurdles ahead. Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party said it’s still not backing the deal, BBC reports. Their support is essential if Johnson wants to pass it through parliament on Saturday.

Brexit deal reaction as PM heads to EU summit - BBC News

We now have a hastily-agreed, last-minute deal, an agreement that would ensure a reasonably orderly British departure from the EU. But despite Boris Johnson’s fanfare, the devil’s in the detail. The Tory party’s own partner in this strange minority government, Northern Ireland’s DUP, won’t back this

We now have a hastily-agreed, last-minute deal, an agreement that would ensure a reasonably orderly British departure from the EU. But despite Boris Johnson’s fanfare, the devil’s in the detail. The Tory party’s own partner in this strange minority government, Northern Ireland’s DUP, won’t back this deal, making it unlikely it’ll get through Parliament.

What comes after the iPhone?

The future of work

The world in 50 years

What will we eat? “A lot more plants,” says scientist and author Bill Nye. Check out the predictions from artist and activist Mai Khôi, Andreessen Horowitz general partner Vijay Pande, transhumanist Zoltan Istvan, and more thought leaders.

The World in 50 Years: What will we eat?

Cool insights, but a lot of wild ideas. Keep in mind, 50 years ago was 1970. The world has not changed that frickin’ much.

First, what a great project Quartz has put together here. Second, eating will be determined by how fast the microprocessor evolves. If we become full cyborgs dependent on solar, etc, we could very quickly as a species lose our need for biological food altogether. That’s what the Singularity is sbout

First, what a great project Quartz has put together here. Second, eating will be determined by how fast the microprocessor evolves. If we become full cyborgs dependent on solar, etc, we could very quickly as a species lose our need for biological food altogether. That’s what the Singularity is sbout. Radical transformation. Super radical!

Meat-free around the world

You'll never guess the world’s best city for vegan-friendly dining. A surprising winner emerges in a new ranking of the top 10 cities for vegan-friendly restaurants.

Guess the world’s best city for vegan-friendly dining! No, try again

On the face of it Dublin would appear to be a shock result, but that's only if you consider a high rate of vegan-friendly restaurants to be a product exclusively of social, cultural and/or religious concentrations that "break through" the norm to establish a new norm.

This theory tends to focus on

On the face of it Dublin would appear to be a shock result, but that's only if you consider a high rate of vegan-friendly restaurants to be a product exclusively of social, cultural and/or religious concentrations that "break through" the norm to establish a new norm.

This theory tends to focus on the notion of "changing minds" among existing populations -- a traditional cultural understanding of the focus of many vegan practitioners -- rather than any analysis of the increasing impact of global population movements and the massively increased interconnection of cities in particular around the planet.

In the case of Dublin, the surprised narrative would have us understand it to be a city still very much in the traditional stereotypical Irish model -- a mix of Catholicism, traditional pub food, Guinness pints and some of the finest of the melancholy arts. In this stage, it is no wonder anyone would be surprised that the opening of a single vegan restaurant, let alone a thriving vegan-friendly culture is a shock to all.

Pints dropped. Instant titterring among groups of elderly women. Elderly men slowly shake their heads and look to the sky. A young Irish babe begins to wail and somewhere in the background a rather frail looking priest in full traditional black cassock and collar faints from the intensity of the experience.

It's an easy narrative and all-to-unfortunately accepted one among far too many when thinking of Dublin.

But there's quite a different one that's clear to many who have watched Dublin transform in the past decades from a local capital of a nation struggling to find it's feet in the shadows of its former imperial masters to one of the major global nodes of trans-national economic, tech, design and culture systems.

As this node, Dublin had seen the world come to it -- to exchange ideas, cultures, technologies and, at the end of the day, populations. While the public mindset of what Dublin is may still be easily lured into traditional archaic stereotypes, the reality is that Dublin's vegan-friendly ranking is nothing more than a reflection of its place among the increasingly tight network of global cities.

We need to start thinking in terms of global culture and networks when we talk about cities that are willing to engage directly in these global networks. Cities will continue to have their own unique flavours, but they will also be drawing upon each other in ways we are not fully appreciating. Reinterpreting our stereotypical assumptions about why city data has the results it does will be essential if we are to effectively understand how our major global urban areas are continuing to evolve.

Fun read! But if it is baed on really fun article. I love the reveal. But, if it is based on Tripadvisor, what about cities that are not as active?

Hungry for more? Come back soon!

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Jay Rosen is pessimistic about the media. So am I.

Jay Rosen is pessimistic about the media. So am I.

Read more on The Ezra Klein Show

From Our Members

  • Once upon a time, the press was playing for scale, trying to be relevant to as large an audience as possible. That required good and comprehensive reporting.

    Then the frenzy for online ad dollars and Twitter followers caused the press to play for clicks over context and insight, weakening the core

    Once upon a time, the press was playing for scale, trying to be relevant to as large an audience as possible. That required good and comprehensive reporting.

    Then the frenzy for online ad dollars and Twitter followers caused the press to play for clicks over context and insight, weakening the core product.

    Now Facebook has taken those ad dollars and the press is scrambling for subscribers. That requires targeting a hard core audience passionate enough about your reporting to pay good money for it. So the reporting becomes more partisan and emotionally-satisfying to keep and grow those subs.

    So here we are with the worst of both click-baiting and pandering to a core partisan subscriber base. There is no one news source you can trust to be objective. The consumer has to read the reporting from across the political spectrum to be a well-informed citizen. The truth is out there, but you have to work for it.

  • 🔈 Really good, if depressing, discussion about journalism in the Trump era. Late in the interview, Jay Rosen and Ezra Klein touch on something that’s been on my mind a lot lately...

    I’m among those who think that increased reader participation in journalism, enabled by the internet, has been a hugely

    🔈 Really good, if depressing, discussion about journalism in the Trump era. Late in the interview, Jay Rosen and Ezra Klein touch on something that’s been on my mind a lot lately...

    I’m among those who think that increased reader participation in journalism, enabled by the internet, has been a hugely positive change, but it’s true that the participation has largely been mediated by platforms with different aims (Facebook) and manifested within newsrooms in pretty narrow ways (traffic data, mostly). There is still a lot of work to be done to realize the potential of a journalism that truly involves readers in a way that benefits them, too. It’s one reason I’m excited about this platform right here.

  • I’ll echo Ezra Klein’s mea culpa: all of us in the news biz have been complicit in the rise of bad habits and bad players. We’ve allowed ourselves to be manipulates, under pressure of financial performance, clicks, eyeballs.

    “we’re getting played, particularly in political reporting and commentary

    I’ll echo Ezra Klein’s mea culpa: all of us in the news biz have been complicit in the rise of bad habits and bad players. We’ve allowed ourselves to be manipulates, under pressure of financial performance, clicks, eyeballs.

    “we’re getting played, particularly in political reporting and commentary, by the outrage merchants and con artists and trolls and polarizers who understand this new world better.”

    We’ve got to operate by higher standards. We have to do better.

  • Sam Harris, nails the journalism problem in this podcast. The press monetized political conflict.

    https://samharris.org/podcasts/140-burning-fourth-estate/

    I’m an old reporter, too. I bailed on the profession to write an historical novel on yellow journalism

    Liberal podcaster Sam Harris, nails it

    Sam Harris, nails the journalism problem in this podcast. The press monetized political conflict.

    https://samharris.org/podcasts/140-burning-fourth-estate/

    I’m an old reporter, too. I bailed on the profession to write an historical novel on yellow journalism

    Liberal podcaster Sam Harris, nails it about the shape of journalism. Press has monetized political conflict Sam Harris

    https://samharris.org/podcasts/140-burning-fourth-estate/

  • I am concerned not that Mr. Rosen is incorrect but that he fails to see his own complicity in how he is wrong. He writes “President Trump is the most successful media hacker out there, but he’s not the only one.” does this display an inherent unacknowledged bias? Clinton, Reagan, Roosevelt were all masters

    I am concerned not that Mr. Rosen is incorrect but that he fails to see his own complicity in how he is wrong. He writes “President Trump is the most successful media hacker out there, but he’s not the only one.” does this display an inherent unacknowledged bias? Clinton, Reagan, Roosevelt were all masters of media manipulation. Media investigative reporting is necessary but to do so without admitting to your own biases is irresponsible and self-destructive.

  • Jay Rosen is a professional media critic so don’t be surprised when he criticizes the media.

    I’m bullish on media, there’s more of it than ever and people are consuming more than ever.

  • I think the media has the opportunity to be more investigative and to have more breakthroughs in research. It’s a work in progress to shift a mindset to real research that is creative, but it is possible.

  • Jay Rosen talks a lot, gets cushy gigs on boards but has never really done anything to fix the problem.

  • I add this column (see below) from Ted Koppel to the discussion.

    I would also add that many journalists, even those at the most respected media institutions, have used social media (predominantly Twitter) to put their credibility severely in doubt. I have had direct conversations with newsroom personnel

    I add this column (see below) from Ted Koppel to the discussion.

    I would also add that many journalists, even those at the most respected media institutions, have used social media (predominantly Twitter) to put their credibility severely in doubt. I have had direct conversations with newsroom personnel about such social media behavior. I have found that a new generation of journalist can't seem to separate personal social media convention from professional social media behavioural needs. Jim VandeHei from Axios recently took aim at at this topic, saying news orgs should ban reporters "from doing anything on social media -- especially Twitter -- beyond sharing stories."

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/trump-has-drawn-much-of-the-media-into-a-distortion-of-their-traditional-roles/2018/09/03/f8046298-ad66-11e8-8a0c-70b618c98d3c_story.html

  • I don't think the democracy of the U.S is being fractured but the public view is changing as the writer of the article implies.

  • The bias of the media has been exposed.

    There are no journalists in America. There hasn’t been any since the late 1970s.

    The liberal bias has been exposed as “fake news” because of the obvious propaganda.

  • Good article but it left me wanting more. I agree with the premise. I am not a journalist so as an outsider what I have seen is the vulnerability of the media to accepting and integrating spin in ways that I don’t think were as prevalent. Is this an accurate perception? I am not sure, where is academia?

  • We live in a time where every story is a breaking story, with no action or repercussion on the culprits, except for a few like the Ronan Farrow #MeToo exposè, due to the fact that someone out there is pushing it #rosemcgowan

  • I listened to the podcast discussion. Absolutely fascinating. Not a ton of answers but some great introspection and beginnings of answers. Anyone who thinks the media isn’t capable of introspection should listen to this discussion.

  • I am fine with networks that have biased coverage. As long as they admit it.

    CNN used to be an objective and top notch news source. Not any longer. They need to admit it, as does their viewers. Having the shyster Avanetti on almost 60 times is as clear evidence of that as you can find.

    I just wish

    I am fine with networks that have biased coverage. As long as they admit it.

    CNN used to be an objective and top notch news source. Not any longer. They need to admit it, as does their viewers. Having the shyster Avanetti on almost 60 times is as clear evidence of that as you can find.

    I just wish there was one now. There isn’t. I watch or read stories from multiple sources and try to figure out which, if any, are on target.

    I wish the networks could get together and develop a totally objective station, paper and radio show.

    Obviously Trump is no saint, or genius, and not everything he does is perfect. Despite his assertions otherwise:).

    Nor is he Satan trying to destroy the country either.