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‘Everyone’ Hates Chardonnay. So Why Is It Still America’s Best-selling Wine?

By Intelligencer

The blockbuster beverage you won’t admit you loveRead full story

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  • Susan  Howson
    Susan HowsonNews Editor at Quartz

    I thought I hated Chardonnay until I realized that I just hate cheap wine. Good Chardonnay is perfectly wonderful. Everyone used to turn up their nose at “blush” wine too and now “rose all day” is a weird catchphrase.

  • Kevin Delaney
    Kevin DelaneyEditor in chief at Quartz

    I had abandoned Chardonnay until trying an amazingly buttery yet crisp one from Burgundy last year. I’ve since found other good ones and they tend to be more expensive...and French.

  • Saying you hate Chardonnay is like saying you hate rice after eating it on an airplane. A Chablis, a stainless Chard and an oaky California version may as well be different wines with different grapes for how far they are from one another. Not to mention Champagne! That said, there is a world of wine beyond the major grapes that is worth drinking your way through in hopes of finding a few things you like!

  • Cheap alcohol?

  • Jay Conner
    Jay Conner

    Don’t blame the grape, blame the marketers who bushwhacked it in California.

    It gets defined by whoever does the quickest and most effective marketing. They set the basic flavor profile, and others follow. Consumers then expect it to taste “like this”, and if yours doesn’t, you won’t be part of the wave.

    In the case of Chardonnay, it came on as a big, overweight, overdressed loud mouthed wine with way too much lipstick.

    Harvested too late, so as to have the maximum overripe melony character

    Don’t blame the grape, blame the marketers who bushwhacked it in California.

    It gets defined by whoever does the quickest and most effective marketing. They set the basic flavor profile, and others follow. Consumers then expect it to taste “like this”, and if yours doesn’t, you won’t be part of the wave.

    In the case of Chardonnay, it came on as a big, overweight, overdressed loud mouthed wine with way too much lipstick.

    Harvested too late, so as to have the maximum overripe melony character, soft from low acidity, highly alcoholic with noticeable residual sweetness, butterscotch notes from malo-lactic, heavy vanillin from toasted oak. Just the wine for the sweet-tooth palate of a public raised on candy and cookies and coke.

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