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Wait, Have We Really Wiped Out 60 Percent of Animals?

Wait, Have We Really Wiped Out 60 Percent of Animals?

Read more on The Atlantic

Contributions

  • Couldn't agree more

    "Especially now, in an era where conspiracy theories run rampant, and lies flow readily from the highest seats of government, it’s more important than ever for those issuing warnings about the planet’s fate to be precise about what they mean.

    Characterizing the problem, and its

    Couldn't agree more

    "Especially now, in an era where conspiracy theories run rampant, and lies flow readily from the highest seats of government, it’s more important than ever for those issuing warnings about the planet’s fate to be precise about what they mean.

    Characterizing the problem, and its scope, correctly matters. If accuracy can be ignored for the sake of a gut punch, we might as well pull random numbers out of the ether. And notably, several news organizations, like Vox and NBC, managed to convey the alarming nature of the Living Planet Index, while accurately stating its findings. The dichotomy between precision and impact is a false one."

  • A lot of the misinformation in “the media” today is due to this specific issue - poor representation of statistics. And the public can’t be let off the hook either. People of all creed and orientation readily accept any reporting of statistics as comprehensive and accurate. In reality, statistics are

    A lot of the misinformation in “the media” today is due to this specific issue - poor representation of statistics. And the public can’t be let off the hook either. People of all creed and orientation readily accept any reporting of statistics as comprehensive and accurate. In reality, statistics are nuanced, with the important details lying in those nuances as the Atlantic has pointed out here.

  • This is just one way statistics are manipulated and spun to generate controversy and crisis, even where there often is none. And why no one trusts science, or the news anymore. In the end, they're all activists trying to make themselves relevant.

  • 1970? What about the circus industry of the 19th century or the slaughter of pre North American sentient life? That's not what you're talking about though is it?

  • My wife made an interesting point the other day about this. We both live in a part of Texas where wild boars can be a huge problem. When I brought this up she looked at me in bewilderment and said, "If we didn't kill animals to a certain extent, they would have easily overrun us humans a long time ago.

    My wife made an interesting point the other day about this. We both live in a part of Texas where wild boars can be a huge problem. When I brought this up she looked at me in bewilderment and said, "If we didn't kill animals to a certain extent, they would have easily overrun us humans a long time ago." And she's essentially correct, isn't she?

    I mean, here in Texas, wild boars are a bane to agriculture. They reproduce like rabbits. They tear through fences, they kill livestock with ease and family pets, and they destroy crops. And the same is true for other kinds of animals. We don't kill them because it's fun. We kill them because we have to.

    Obviously, there are certain animals whose population needs to be controlled and there are others that need to be protected. That's always been a difficult balance. More needs to be done in determining and teaching our kids what that balance should look like and why it's important for some animals to die sometimes and why others should live.

    But no matter what happens, it should always be clear that a human life, no matter the circumstance, is infinantly more valuable than any animal.