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When No One Retires

When No One Retires

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Contributions

  • The greying of the workforce is definitely an opportunity if we can continue to keep older workers productive (retraining, work adaptation), and fulfill the demands they will generate (eg healthcare, leisure). But it also creates an set of imperatives, because we simply won’t have enough workers to generate

    The greying of the workforce is definitely an opportunity if we can continue to keep older workers productive (retraining, work adaptation), and fulfill the demands they will generate (eg healthcare, leisure). But it also creates an set of imperatives, because we simply won’t have enough workers to generate the economic growth we’ve enjoyed historically. So we’ll need all of the AI, robotics and automation we can deploy, along with all the workers (including older ones) working in order to keep increasing our prosperity.

  • Companies are all talking wanting diversity and inclusion. D&I goes beyond race and gender. It includes the diversity of thought of this aging demographic. Companies need to “play the room game” and be creative about how they design jobs in order to leverage all of this institutional knowledgeable.

  • I’ve given up any plans for the golden years. Nowadays I’m just hoping for at least a few gold-plated years.

    I’m lucky I’m that I’m in a business where age won’t necessarily push me into retirement. As long as my brain’s sharp, I can keep writing. At least, that’s my hope, because I also don’t really

    I’ve given up any plans for the golden years. Nowadays I’m just hoping for at least a few gold-plated years.

    I’m lucky I’m that I’m in a business where age won’t necessarily push me into retirement. As long as my brain’s sharp, I can keep writing. At least, that’s my hope, because I also don’t really ever expect to be comfortable enough to actually retire. As a society, we have totally bungled our economic calibrations, and successive waves of retirees are going to suffer because of it.

  • This is a positive development. There are many health and mental benefits to delaying retirement. I anticipate more flexible work arrangements will benefit semi-retirees most. They have different goals and ambitions in the work place.

  • I never saw myself as someone who would retire. But would I be willing to do something different than a big corporate job maybe? In either case I plan to be curious and engaged ... which I think keeps you going. And btw different views including those who have more experience (eg age) always yield more interesting results.

  • My long term concern here is how this would affect college graduates/people entering the workforce—if the retirement rate is slowing down faster than rate of economic expansion, that would theoretically limit job openings, which would then pressure students into graduate programs creating more debt which

    My long term concern here is how this would affect college graduates/people entering the workforce—if the retirement rate is slowing down faster than rate of economic expansion, that would theoretically limit job openings, which would then pressure students into graduate programs creating more debt which would halt retirement plans even more than we have now

  • Retirement is a misguided creation of the tail end of the industrial age. It should be called transformation - workers and companies alike need a broader perspective of utilizing deep experience and evolving capabilities of the mature worker.

  • Not to sound crass, but haven’t we realized inclusion, diversity, and the “graying” of the workforce are producing better outcomes for quite awhile? Where have you been, HBR? Why do you always point out obvious trends about 5 years behind the curve?

  • THIS: “they provide emotional stability, complex problem-solving skills, nuanced thinking, and institutional know-how. Their talents complement those of younger workers,” The reality is that we must see the opportunity in the demographics driven changes in the workforce.. older workers may start seeing

    THIS: “they provide emotional stability, complex problem-solving skills, nuanced thinking, and institutional know-how. Their talents complement those of younger workers,” The reality is that we must see the opportunity in the demographics driven changes in the workforce.. older workers may start seeing a more receptive workplace because there won’t be a choice and a more multi generational workforce will be the norm. But older workers will have to meet a higher bar- no excuses when it comes to keeping up with tech and relevant trends.

  • One of the best opportunities is for 360-mentorship, meaning dispelling the notion that mentoring is a one way street (from old to young). Anyone with a unique perspective has something to share. Older workers could share industry history and a wider aperture on trends, whereas younger ones, the bleeding

    One of the best opportunities is for 360-mentorship, meaning dispelling the notion that mentoring is a one way street (from old to young). Anyone with a unique perspective has something to share. Older workers could share industry history and a wider aperture on trends, whereas younger ones, the bleeding edge of technology and culture.

  • What an eye-opening stat: By 2035, Americans of retirement age will eclipse the number of people aged 18 and under for the first time in U.S. history. Now knowing that, it makes sense why all those traditional job summers for teens like being a lifeguard or working in a fast-food restaurant are being

    What an eye-opening stat: By 2035, Americans of retirement age will eclipse the number of people aged 18 and under for the first time in U.S. history. Now knowing that, it makes sense why all those traditional job summers for teens like being a lifeguard or working in a fast-food restaurant are being reinvented for workers nearing retirement age.

  • The issue currently arising in Japan presents a unique case in relation to this. The baby boomer generation is "hogging" the executive positions within Japanese forms that value seniority over ability. As John Toomey mentioned in his Pick, limited job openings may become a real issue in the future.

  • Surely there will be a bar somewhere that will hire me as a 90-year-old bartender...right?

  • I think it’s alarming that many of the people opting to retire later aren’t doing so by choice but because they have to. They don’t have adequate savings and have to work longer in the time when they are meant to be relaxing and enjoying themselves.

  • My retirement plan is to die in saddle in an Aeron chair and the team can just roll me out and initiate the succession plan. ✌🏻

  • On this subject I’d recommend reading Nicola Palmarini’s research on “ageism” at IBM. Getting older has never been such an opportunity!

  • #retirementFAIL - that’s me!

  • The Grey Wave !! ”the irreversible rate at which the world’s population is aging.”