Skip to navigationSkip to content
Richard A. Chance

Good evening.

Changing the game for health

Monopolizing deportation

The sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE. There is only one carrier willing to take on US deportation flights and they're charging the US government nearly double the normal price, making flights as expensive as $33,500 per hour in November.

Sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to take the contract for fear of negative press. But last month, those 767s were tied up with other, richer customers (i.e. the Dept. of Defense). So ICE was forced to take whatever the carrier offered—a 777 that was a couple of hundred seats bigger than what ICE needed, and double the price: $33,000/flight hr vs $17,000/flight hr. The company knows it's the only game in town and has no incentive to meet ICE halfway, according to ICE's primary charter broker, explaining why it can't put any pressure on the subcontractor to come down on its rate.

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge whatever it wants.

Justin shows here how much this lack of competition is costing US taxpayers. It doesn't mean we should support all of ICE's activities but it does expose a dark side to an already dark law enforcement project.

Every now and then, my faith is restored that the markets really know how to do their job. I'll use this as a lesson tonight to teach my kid the basics about supply and demand, and about how actions have consequences.

The myth of work perfection

The perfect morning routine doesn’t exist. The “optimized” morning peddled by celebrities, tech gurus, and influencers isn’t realistic for everyone, the Atlantic reports. And trying to achieve one could impact your mental health.

The False Promise of Morning Routines

The exhaustive analysis we've been doing on the morning routines of famous people has gotten so out of control, we've basically been copying what tech execs are doing with biohacking.

We all have different styles, and Marina nails what we need to do at the end:

"I would be better off embracing my scattered

The exhaustive analysis we've been doing on the morning routines of famous people has gotten so out of control, we've basically been copying what tech execs are doing with biohacking.

We all have different styles, and Marina nails what we need to do at the end:

"I would be better off embracing my scattered mornings and pinpointing the bits and pieces I could simplify, rather than mimicking someone else’s morning routine, no matter how nice it looks from the outside."

A solid "morning routine" for a person is dedicated to create presence, calm, and focus so we can tackle the crazy days ahead of us. We can observe others, but we need to learn and adapt, not straight-up copy.

It's the most wonderful time of the year?

Phones aren't always our friends

The impeachment report report

The way we age now

New planet, same problems

Disrupting dementia

Science can’t fix dementia’s most heartbreaking problem. No matter how far science advances, it will never be able to tell you how to personally deal with a dementia diagnosis. ✦

Science can’t fix dementia’s most heartbreaking problem

As a science journalist, I believe there's always an answer for how to do things. That's why reporting this story was so hard: I learned there IS no guidebook for taking care of a person with dementia. It's scary and lonely and heartbreaking.

I cried while interviewing my parents for this story, and

As a science journalist, I believe there's always an answer for how to do things. That's why reporting this story was so hard: I learned there IS no guidebook for taking care of a person with dementia. It's scary and lonely and heartbreaking.

I cried while interviewing my parents for this story, and choked up talking to my friend, and a stranger. It was an eye opening experience, and I'm grateful they shared their stories.

An excellent journalistic piece that integrates the human element successfully with the stakes of the successes of scientific research (here finding cures for the many forms of dementia). Also, an excellent example of why science journalists are essential in bridging the gap between the hard reality

An excellent journalistic piece that integrates the human element successfully with the stakes of the successes of scientific research (here finding cures for the many forms of dementia). Also, an excellent example of why science journalists are essential in bridging the gap between the hard reality of patients and their families, and the surgical/cold eye of scientists and healthcare practitioners on these devastating diseases.

Bitcoin crime doesn't pay

The US jobs report is coming

Our crystal ball says you'll be back

Close
The Right Way to Speak Truth to Power

The Right Way to Speak Truth to Power

Read more on Harvard Business Review

Contributions

  • It takes courage to speak up, but it takes goodwill to get heard. Build it by establishing that (1) you excel at your job, (2) you’re not selfish, and (3) you’re invested in the organization.

  • Love this topic. It's so so rare for people to speak truth to power particularly in the corporate arena. While you can learn how to do this more effectively, first you have to be the kind of person who thinks its the right thing to do. You also have to be willing to pay the price if they dont want to

    Love this topic. It's so so rare for people to speak truth to power particularly in the corporate arena. While you can learn how to do this more effectively, first you have to be the kind of person who thinks its the right thing to do. You also have to be willing to pay the price if they dont want to hear what you have to say. Most people believe the less they say the more secure they are. The real question is do you have the courage to speak... then you can determine how best to do it. And if you have the capital to do so. But even then you have to be willing to be excused from the table ... cause the reality is that it more often than not doesn't go well for truth tellers

  • I do not know how I missed this article. It is such an important subject. Every institution is made better by people willing to raise tough issues with those in senior positions in the institution. If two people I respect had not commented on this subject, I would never have seen it. It is for this reason

    I do not know how I missed this article. It is such an important subject. Every institution is made better by people willing to raise tough issues with those in senior positions in the institution. If two people I respect had not commented on this subject, I would never have seen it. It is for this reason I am a strong supporter of this platform.

  • I would rename this article “How to speak up on difficult subjects at work while keeping your job and making your boss happy.” Most of the strategies it outlines also explain why so many acquisitions and integrations of outside teams fail, especially those acquired as change agents (and even more so

    I would rename this article “How to speak up on difficult subjects at work while keeping your job and making your boss happy.” Most of the strategies it outlines also explain why so many acquisitions and integrations of outside teams fail, especially those acquired as change agents (and even more so in tech where management often has less relevant skills). I’ve gone through several good and bad experiences, but the most epic fail was having a startup acquired by Nokia. It’s worthy of a book, but there simply wasn’t any way for an entire management team trained as electrical and mechanical engineers to understand, much less lead, an urgent shift into software, data and the app economy. Transforming Nokia may be a bit of an outlier scenario compared to everyday challenges people face at work, but I think this article needs to better acknowledge these more difficult cases, especially given their importance to the welfare of companies and their employees.

  • The common factor in all the scenarios is to believe in the company and the work you are doing. Speaking power is a main concern i see a lot of people with in the organization having social challenge to speak up on what they believe in, they dont know how it will be perceived by the management. Excellent article!

  • I would be interested in seeing examples of collective action changing the course of companies. The idea of one changemaker is a romantic one, but in reality, real revolutions are made when groups of people come together to make a real change. People are more likely to be courageous when they are not

    I would be interested in seeing examples of collective action changing the course of companies. The idea of one changemaker is a romantic one, but in reality, real revolutions are made when groups of people come together to make a real change. People are more likely to be courageous when they are not the lone voice. We wouldn't have a five day work week without collective action and we should be sure to not forget that.

  • Excellent article filled with tons of practical advice. Frankly advice that I normally fail to heed and thus need reminding 😂

    A few thoughts: I would replace “competence” with “trust”. It may be the case that, in some areas, you’re more competent than the organization is capable of recognizing. But

    Excellent article filled with tons of practical advice. Frankly advice that I normally fail to heed and thus need reminding 😂

    A few thoughts: I would replace “competence” with “trust”. It may be the case that, in some areas, you’re more competent than the organization is capable of recognizing. But if they trust you that’s functionally good enough.

    This article talks about ways to establish organizational trust by demonstrating that your goals and theirs are in alignment. Then it gives practical advice for managing the emotional creatures that we all are (including managing your own emotions).

    This sits slightly askew of the notion of Cultures of Candor. Such cultures prefer candor and improvement vs politeness and conflict avoidance (I took that phrasing from Netflix). But these cultures are high friction. Typically inhabited by high performers. And they are incredibly difficult to scale. Each individual needs to have the maturity to not take personally criticisms of their ideas. Each individual also needs to be practiced in intellectual honesty and humility. Admit when you’re wrong without digging in to save face. Cultures of candor can also devolve into “one way” candor where bosses are candid with subordinates (and perhaps peers), but are resistant to it from subordinates as they see it as a threat to their leadership.

    Separately there’s the issue that the organization needs to be able to recognize your competence. It may be the case that the organization simply doesn’t recognize their deficiencies. Like telling someone they have a limp and they just look at you and say “but this is the only way I’ve ever walked.” Sorta like a Dunning-Kruger effect. Such a situation requires an extra level of care. As this article states, you have to practice patience and run a long game. And then recognize that you may never get there.

    If you’re someone that “doesn’t suffer fools lightly” (ahem, looks in mirror) this is great advice. Finding inner restraint and empathy for others will get you much further ahead than the alternative of chastising people that may not have the insight (yet) to understand why they’re falling short of your expectations.

  • I have learned when you speak truth to power from the place of knowing that the person in power wants to continue to grow as a professional, you are in safer ground. I did this with my boss, knowing he cares so much about our field, he welcomed honest feedback. We were able to discuss make privilege

    I have learned when you speak truth to power from the place of knowing that the person in power wants to continue to grow as a professional, you are in safer ground. I did this with my boss, knowing he cares so much about our field, he welcomed honest feedback. We were able to discuss make privilege in a female dominated field and he has gone on to help other males understand it.

  • Three things: framing their issue in terms that the audience will relate to, making effective use of data, and managing the emotions in the room. (See “Further Reading” for more on persuasion.) They connect their agenda to the organization’s priorities or values, or explain how it addresses critical

    Three things: framing their issue in terms that the audience will relate to, making effective use of data, and managing the emotions in the room. (See “Further Reading” for more on persuasion.) They connect their agenda to the organization’s priorities or values, or explain how it addresses critical areas of concern for stakeholders. They ensure that decision makers feel included—not attacked or pushed aside.