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Lorenzo Gritti

Good morning.

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The escalating Syria conflict

What comes after the iPhone?

Can Apple do it again? The iPhone turned Apple from a successful computer company into the world’s most profitable consumer electronics operation. But as this Quartz member exclusive shows, its success could also spell Apple’s undoing.

Can Apple do it again?

Apple is at crossroads. It revolutionized the way we communicate with the iPhone nearly 13 years ago, but its longtime cash cow has started to waver. Apple has a host of new bets in the works, some that could also change the world as the iPhone did. But will any of them actually be able to do it?

Apple is currently a perfect example of a business case where a company which itself creates a high bar that it become de facto standard and is now at crossroads as it hasn't been able to repeat its same success.

Consumers are looking for beyond mobile phone for sure. Hence very interesting to watch

Apple is currently a perfect example of a business case where a company which itself creates a high bar that it become de facto standard and is now at crossroads as it hasn't been able to repeat its same success.

Consumers are looking for beyond mobile phone for sure. Hence very interesting to watch as to how they would turn it around by either building a full ecosystem of products/services or new revolutionary ideas.

I don't think apple will be able to come up with a product as influential as the Iphone was to its quarterly revenue. The focus should really be on the apple ecosystem (apple pay, music, tv...etc). This would mean selling the iphone at an even cheaper price to allow users to embrace apple services. This

I don't think apple will be able to come up with a product as influential as the Iphone was to its quarterly revenue. The focus should really be on the apple ecosystem (apple pay, music, tv...etc). This would mean selling the iphone at an even cheaper price to allow users to embrace apple services. This is the most sensible strategy in the near term while they work on the next big thing which may not be big after all.

I see hope that Apple will soon re-imagine the mobile device again. Consumers are craving a new way, simpler method of connecting and communicating. Stagnant iPhone growth shows that we’ve hit a wall of all the doo dads and new wrappers that simply boost the current experience. But I see a glimmer of

I see hope that Apple will soon re-imagine the mobile device again. Consumers are craving a new way, simpler method of connecting and communicating. Stagnant iPhone growth shows that we’ve hit a wall of all the doo dads and new wrappers that simply boost the current experience. But I see a glimmer of change with Apple’s introduction of screen time, grayscale, health monitoring, which potentially forecasts the company’s testing of a new experience that combats the addictive tech dependencies and negative impacts of its tentpole product. Holding out hope for a re-imagining as Apple approaches an anniversary year :)

Apple’s streaming service is surrounded by questions. We know that Apple TV+ will cost $4.99, that it’ll launch on Nov. 1 with eight original series, and that it won’t have ads. But most of the rest is still a mystery.

Trying to dominate TV is like nothing Apple has ever done before

It is smart to offer the service at $5/month...

I am not convinced that Apple will dominate original content out of the gate. It would depend heavily upon personnel. Everyone loves to festoon Netflix and Amazon with developmental praise but from what I’ve seen, most of their best content is leftovers

It is smart to offer the service at $5/month...

I am not convinced that Apple will dominate original content out of the gate. It would depend heavily upon personnel. Everyone loves to festoon Netflix and Amazon with developmental praise but from what I’ve seen, most of their best content is leftovers from things developed elsewhere. I truly believe that unless you bring on the behind-the-scenes creatives, your front-of-house content will not have the same depth and stamina boasted by the long term heavy hitters like HBO. Not to mention half of what Netflix distributes was created entirely independent of the studio, which is cool and great but doesn’t prove that the newcomers have the secret sauce recipe. It just indicates they can recognize another’s well conceived ideas and then distribute them, which is a very smart way to build your catalogue and brand loyalty while waiting for the truly original content to resonate. Apple doesn’t have a catalogue and the current trend of pulling libraries is likely to continue.

Apple did right to bring over some great industry heavy hitters but imagining yourself as a direct competitor of HBO is a bit like me taking my first novel to Random House.

Trump’s Italy connection

Literary polemics

Economics Nobel prize

The Nobel prize for economic sciences was announced. The joint winners are Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo, and Michael Kremer, for their work in alleviating global poverty.

Three professors won the 2019 Nobel prize for economics for their work on fighting poverty

In India, where he was born and completed his early studies, the praise for Banerjee might be grudging, at best. He is not a supporter of the current government and has been a dissenting voice on several key issues. As I write this, the prime minister, so prolific on social media, is yet to offer any

In India, where he was born and completed his early studies, the praise for Banerjee might be grudging, at best. He is not a supporter of the current government and has been a dissenting voice on several key issues. As I write this, the prime minister, so prolific on social media, is yet to offer any congratulations to only the tenth Nobel laureate of Indian origin.

The last Nobel for poverty alleviation went to Muhammad Yunus, the Bangladeshi social entrepreneur, banker and economist, for founding the Grameen Bank and pioneering the concepts of microcredit and microfinance. But he didn’t get an economics Nobel. He won the Peace Prize. It seems significant that

The last Nobel for poverty alleviation went to Muhammad Yunus, the Bangladeshi social entrepreneur, banker and economist, for founding the Grameen Bank and pioneering the concepts of microcredit and microfinance. But he didn’t get an economics Nobel. He won the Peace Prize. It seems significant that the work of Esther Duflo and her longtime collaborator and partner Abhijit Banerjee (as well as Michael Kremer) has been recognised in this way. That too, just days ahead of the UN’s International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, a rather anodyne designation, but now given a new focus. A different-strokes-for-different-folks approach that truly tries to understood how the poor make decisions about housing, healthcare, hygiene products even.

Two ideas for greener travels

Frequent flyers should pay more. A new report commissioned by the UK government suggests an update to miles programs that makes them suitable to the climate change era: add up the miles traveled by tourists and apply increasingly severe taxes the more they fly.

Frequent flyers should pay more, not less, for their travel

To me, this is more about signaling fairness (in terms of people getting equal access to the emissions pie) than it is about actually cutting them down. Though I also don’t think that's really a problem—if people feel that emissions are distributed unequally, it's very hard to get them on board to cut

To me, this is more about signaling fairness (in terms of people getting equal access to the emissions pie) than it is about actually cutting them down. Though I also don’t think that's really a problem—if people feel that emissions are distributed unequally, it's very hard to get them on board to cut their own/vote for politicians who will support infrastructure that does so (usually at a cost to taxpayers).

China’s culture wars

China’s propaganda app can snoop into users’ phones. The Chinese Communist Party bills its app as a fun educational tool. But it can learn the habits of more than 100 million users.

An app to teach Xi Jinping thought can study the phones of its 100 million users

Funny, you’d figure the CCP would have co-opted Weibo to do exactly the same thing - but with a great many more users. Of course, there is nothing that says it hasn’t done that also. More of the same from China’s all glorious, just and far seeing Communist Party.

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