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Richard A. Chance

Good evening.

Changing the game for health

Monopolizing deportation

The sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE. There is only one carrier willing to take on US deportation flights and they're charging the US government nearly double the normal price, making flights as expensive as $33,500 per hour in November.

Sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to take the contract for fear of negative press. But last month, those 767s were tied up with other, richer customers (i.e. the Dept. of Defense). So ICE was forced to take whatever the carrier offered—a 777 that was a couple of hundred seats bigger than what ICE needed, and double the price: $33,000/flight hr vs $17,000/flight hr. The company knows it's the only game in town and has no incentive to meet ICE halfway, according to ICE's primary charter broker, explaining why it can't put any pressure on the subcontractor to come down on its rate.

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge whatever it wants.

Justin shows here how much this lack of competition is costing US taxpayers. It doesn't mean we should support all of ICE's activities but it does expose a dark side to an already dark law enforcement project.

Every now and then, my faith is restored that the markets really know how to do their job. I'll use this as a lesson tonight to teach my kid the basics about supply and demand, and about how actions have consequences.

The myth of work perfection

The perfect morning routine doesn’t exist. The “optimized” morning peddled by celebrities, tech gurus, and influencers isn’t realistic for everyone, the Atlantic reports. And trying to achieve one could impact your mental health.

The False Promise of Morning Routines

The exhaustive analysis we've been doing on the morning routines of famous people has gotten so out of control, we've basically been copying what tech execs are doing with biohacking.

We all have different styles, and Marina nails what we need to do at the end:

"I would be better off embracing my scattered

The exhaustive analysis we've been doing on the morning routines of famous people has gotten so out of control, we've basically been copying what tech execs are doing with biohacking.

We all have different styles, and Marina nails what we need to do at the end:

"I would be better off embracing my scattered mornings and pinpointing the bits and pieces I could simplify, rather than mimicking someone else’s morning routine, no matter how nice it looks from the outside."

A solid "morning routine" for a person is dedicated to create presence, calm, and focus so we can tackle the crazy days ahead of us. We can observe others, but we need to learn and adapt, not straight-up copy.

It's the most wonderful time of the year?

Phones aren't always our friends

The impeachment report report

The way we age now

New planet, same problems

Disrupting dementia

Science can’t fix dementia’s most heartbreaking problem. No matter how far science advances, it will never be able to tell you how to personally deal with a dementia diagnosis. ✦

Science can’t fix dementia’s most heartbreaking problem

As a science journalist, I believe there's always an answer for how to do things. That's why reporting this story was so hard: I learned there IS no guidebook for taking care of a person with dementia. It's scary and lonely and heartbreaking.

I cried while interviewing my parents for this story, and

As a science journalist, I believe there's always an answer for how to do things. That's why reporting this story was so hard: I learned there IS no guidebook for taking care of a person with dementia. It's scary and lonely and heartbreaking.

I cried while interviewing my parents for this story, and choked up talking to my friend, and a stranger. It was an eye opening experience, and I'm grateful they shared their stories.

An excellent journalistic piece that integrates the human element successfully with the stakes of the successes of scientific research (here finding cures for the many forms of dementia). Also, an excellent example of why science journalists are essential in bridging the gap between the hard reality

An excellent journalistic piece that integrates the human element successfully with the stakes of the successes of scientific research (here finding cures for the many forms of dementia). Also, an excellent example of why science journalists are essential in bridging the gap between the hard reality of patients and their families, and the surgical/cold eye of scientists and healthcare practitioners on these devastating diseases.

Bitcoin crime doesn't pay

The US jobs report is coming

Our crystal ball says you'll be back

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Ford, Walmart to collaborate on designing automated-vehicle delivery

Ford, Walmart to collaborate on designing automated-vehicle delivery

Read more on Reuters

Contributions

  • Really cool collaboration, of which Ford sorely needs, aimed squarely at not only servicing traditional consumer needs but at elevating the experience by adding convenience and additional value to the buying process. In tomorrow's economy, collaborations like this one will win the day. Capital and resources

    Really cool collaboration, of which Ford sorely needs, aimed squarely at not only servicing traditional consumer needs but at elevating the experience by adding convenience and additional value to the buying process. In tomorrow's economy, collaborations like this one will win the day. Capital and resources can be saved and services can be launched more quickly. Nice to see some "old guard" and "new guard" brands getting creative and collaborative to solve problems and offer solutions. Side note - yet another heat-seeking missile fired from Walmart fixed squarely on Amazon.

  • Is PostMates the new Webvan? Time will tell.

  • INDUSTRY 4.0: EPISODE 1

    “Look ma, no hands”

    Autonomous vehicles and robots are about to hit the road at scale. Yeah, there have been a couple very public and tragic incidents involving Uber and Tesla, however, it has been found that 81 out of 88 accidents involving self-driving cars have been caused

    INDUSTRY 4.0: EPISODE 1

    “Look ma, no hands”

    Autonomous vehicles and robots are about to hit the road at scale. Yeah, there have been a couple very public and tragic incidents involving Uber and Tesla, however, it has been found that 81 out of 88 accidents involving self-driving cars have been caused by human error according to an Axios’ study of California’s DMV reports from 2014 to 2018.

    Today, every major car maker and plenty technology companies are testing and fine tuning autonomous vehicles and while there are still regulatory hurdles to overcome, there’s no doubt in my mind that this tech will be the first one to kill the most jobs in a very short period of time, starting in developed countries and reaching the rest of the world shortly after that. In the US, almost 3% of workers are drivers of some sort according to the Census Bureau of occupational data. Considering that this year’s unemployment rate is around 4%, the impact of this alone would be a comparable loss of jobs like the one suffered from 2016 to 2019.

    Yes, jobs are being lost at manufacturing processes due to automatization, however the rate will be slower and the decisions to be made are spread out over thousands of big corporations and SMBs (relatively speaking). For driverless cars, government regulation is actually faster to change due to its centralized nature.

    The new economy will require new skillsets and new jobs, but in the short term, the shift in workforce requirements will create some tensions on the validity and even morality of these technologies. Organizations should prepare, understand and engage these technologies to be able to survive.

    The era of early adopters has arrived.