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These are the skills to learn for the future of work, according to the World Economic Forum

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Contributions

  • This list implies a future in which humans frame problems that computers can solve. But humans can inspire, console, encourage, and teach. Why isn’t the future of work using the inherent gifts that emphasize our humanity?

  • This is spot-on with the trends I have seen over the last decade with AI and machine learning in the workforce. The way I see it, humans and their technological counterparts (whether that’s automated data workflows or full-on physical robots) are naturally suited to operate at opposite sides of the spectrum

    This is spot-on with the trends I have seen over the last decade with AI and machine learning in the workforce. The way I see it, humans and their technological counterparts (whether that’s automated data workflows or full-on physical robots) are naturally suited to operate at opposite sides of the spectrum and will continue to move toward their respective sides. These WEF predictions make sense, in that humans will continue to move away from the types of functions that take a lot of time and little complex mental process and toward roles that are inherently creative and usually require some level of out-of-the-box thinking.

  • I disagree on management of personnel - that seems like a permanent and important skill for humans. But agree on active learning - living, as I do, in an industry that is constantly facing change and disruption, it’s clear that will be necessary. Because everyone will face this kind of change and disruption

    I disagree on management of personnel - that seems like a permanent and important skill for humans. But agree on active learning - living, as I do, in an industry that is constantly facing change and disruption, it’s clear that will be necessary. Because everyone will face this kind of change and disruption - except maybe the cement industry from what I hear.

  • I’m sure very smart people thought these through. But the last time we predicted what the future of the workforce looked like we ended shop class and home-ec in schools. Then we predicted computers would replace all. Then we outsourced everything to China and India. Now we have a shortage of tradesmen

    I’m sure very smart people thought these through. But the last time we predicted what the future of the workforce looked like we ended shop class and home-ec in schools. Then we predicted computers would replace all. Then we outsourced everything to China and India. Now we have a shortage of tradesmen and truck drivers. And the cost of doing business in the United States is skyrocketing.

  • Not directly stated here, but is a subject of concern in many studies looking at the impact of the changing economy on workers, is that jobs and skills traditionally seen as "feminine" (emotional intelligence, creative problem solving, social influence) are growing and traditionally "masculine" skills

    Not directly stated here, but is a subject of concern in many studies looking at the impact of the changing economy on workers, is that jobs and skills traditionally seen as "feminine" (emotional intelligence, creative problem solving, social influence) are growing and traditionally "masculine" skills (mainly skilled labor) are on the decline. Many already fear that our current economy has left men behind in a lot of ways, even though they continue to hold the majority of high powered positions. I'll be curious to see how that changes in the near future.

  • While there are some good themes here (e.g., importance of critical thinking and emotional intelligence) and some interesting notes (declining importance of reading and verbal skills?), I wonder if this perhaps an incorrect or incomplete frame. When do we start to think about the skills we should foster

    While there are some good themes here (e.g., importance of critical thinking and emotional intelligence) and some interesting notes (declining importance of reading and verbal skills?), I wonder if this perhaps an incorrect or incomplete frame. When do we start to think about the skills we should foster and develop for a vibrant and thriving society. It’s possible that what is good for work (i.e., companies’ benefit) might not be what’s good for all of us collectively (individuals’ / society’s benefit). Noting the WEF’s slogan of ‘Committed to Improving the state of the world,’ we need to consider the broader and bigger question. While economic development has provided many benefits, there have also been costs. Is the trajectory inevitable, or should it be shaped?

  • I was really excited to see the 2022 list of growing and declining skills according to WEF. But when I read it, I’m a bit underwhelmed. I get the growing list but it’s also a list of skills that have been growing consistently over the years. The declining list of skills is interesting and debatable

    I was really excited to see the 2022 list of growing and declining skills according to WEF. But when I read it, I’m a bit underwhelmed. I get the growing list but it’s also a list of skills that have been growing consistently over the years. The declining list of skills is interesting and debatable. I’m specifically referring to #5 & 6 - math, writing, active listening, and management of personnel? The management (or leadership) styles may evolve but I don’t see that declining. In fact, in the VUCA world we live it, it’s a growing skill to help teams navigate through change and market disruptions.

  • Active listening and active learning go hand in hand. I have not seen a world which makes one fast track and learn while not actively listening to what needs to be put to action!! Active listening leads to active learning.

  • I would add skills for identifying and definining problems to solve.

  • The articles mentions “management of personnel” will become less important, but the top growing skills all involve being a good manager: problem-solving, critical thinking, emotional intelligence, they even specifically mention leadership.

    The workforce wants more than a body to fill a space, they’re

    The articles mentions “management of personnel” will become less important, but the top growing skills all involve being a good manager: problem-solving, critical thinking, emotional intelligence, they even specifically mention leadership.

    The workforce wants more than a body to fill a space, they’re looking for forward-thinkers who like to improve and innovate