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May's Brexit Plan in Chaos After Quickfire Cabinet Resignations

By Bloomberg

Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab quit the U.K. Cabinet over Theresa May’s handling of Brexit, dealing a severe blow to the prime minister who must now consider if her position is tenable. The pound tumbled

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  • Ben Wright
    Ben WrightBusiness Editor at The Telegraph

    There’s a lot of noise around Westminster and it is impossible to predict what happens next. But here are a few things that are true:

    1) It is very hard under Conservative Party rules for them to depose a leader who wants to cling on

    2) The Parliamentary maths suggests it’s going to be hard for May to pass the Withdrawal Agreement

    3) However, there is even less political appetite for the other two alternatives - a no-deal Brexit or a second referendum

    4) Logic therefore dictates that the most likely

    There’s a lot of noise around Westminster and it is impossible to predict what happens next. But here are a few things that are true:

    1) It is very hard under Conservative Party rules for them to depose a leader who wants to cling on

    2) The Parliamentary maths suggests it’s going to be hard for May to pass the Withdrawal Agreement

    3) However, there is even less political appetite for the other two alternatives - a no-deal Brexit or a second referendum

    4) Logic therefore dictates that the most likely outcome now is that May holds on to get the deal through Parliament possibly at the second or third time of asking with a few tweaks

    5) The above four points could turn out to be nonsense within hours

    6) This is only the Withdrawal Agreement. We haven’t even started negotiating the UK’s future relationship with the EU.....

  • The process was never going to go well when May had to fight her own cabinet, the Labor party AND Europe to deliver on a “Brexit” that was undefined and therefore each party took to mean different things. Over 60% of population would now favour a new referendum but for political reasons government will never support that. A small majority of voters in a small island believing they were still a Great Empire have shot the rest of us in the foot.

  • Nick Fox
    Nick FoxChief Communications Officer at Virgin

    Sadly this was so predictable - as Theresa May was forced to try to appease the hard line Brexiters who had no practical plan for the separation. The muddle that the UK now finds itself in - with just five months to exit - looks tough to sell to anyone. Time for another vote and then what...

  • Ian Myers
    Ian MyersFounder at Country House Enterprises

    May has had an uphill struggle every step of the way. I give her credit for persistence, but this is a huge hurdle.

    Bloomberg now reporting Jacob Rees-Mogg seeking a vote of no confidence in May.

  • It takes courage to admit mistakes and change them. 60% of the population is ready to do that. Are 60% of the politicians?

  • Taichi Fukai
    Taichi FukaiStudent at Waseda University

    Just yesterday, we were hopeful that there will be no defectors. Now, out of all the cabinet members, the person responsible in decluttering this mess, has rashly quit.

    If the leading negotiator can't even agree on the fundamentals of the deal, how are the people supposed to get behind any deal?

    Step up, Mrs. May, or step down.

    Theresa May: Cabinet backs draft Brexit plan.

    https://share.qz.com//news/1268398/

  • David Sporn
    David SpornDirector at Active Element Productions

    This isn’t particularly surprising. I say good for Dominic Raab, it’s tough to stick to your principles. May was never going to negotiate anything remotely resembling a hard Brexit. DUP’s next move will be fascinating to watch.

  • Catherine Tannahill
    Catherine Tannahillprof, teacher

    Would have preferred more actual information & less 'gossip.' What are the problems? Where are the areas of disagreement? I find most Brexit articles notoriously devoid of content with all the emphasis on political posturing. I hope the Brits are getting better info?

  • Kyo Kaku
    Kyo KakuVice President at China-Japan J/V

    No surprise to see backlash from the hardliner.

    How can you possibly call that an “exit”???

    UK has agreed to pay £39 billion of “divorce” fine equivalent to the UK net contribution to the EU annual budget of four years, which I’m pretty sure will be additionally charged in case stranded negotiation over Irish border issues and/or tariff issues result in extension of transition period beyond 2020, during which UK’s EU membership as well as obligation to follow the EU rules will be fully maintained

    No surprise to see backlash from the hardliner.

    How can you possibly call that an “exit”???

    UK has agreed to pay £39 billion of “divorce” fine equivalent to the UK net contribution to the EU annual budget of four years, which I’m pretty sure will be additionally charged in case stranded negotiation over Irish border issues and/or tariff issues result in extension of transition period beyond 2020, during which UK’s EU membership as well as obligation to follow the EU rules will be fully maintained.

    Anyways, this referendum demonstrated a flaw of democracy that the people only concerned with partial interests surrounding them can never do any good for the optimal equilibrium as a whole nation.

  • David Yakobovitch
    David YakobovitchAI Professor at Galvanize

    Brexit will bring the UK out ahead, as other European countries consider a switch from unity to disjoint sovereignty. The bigger question is what will the ripple effect be? Could talks to create a similar South American zone will lose ground, as well as packs for Asian alliances?

    Perhaps the largest threat is the realization from European leader countries (Germany, Ireland, And France), that the value gained from the EU may have been more superficial. This looking glass moment for the world may

    Brexit will bring the UK out ahead, as other European countries consider a switch from unity to disjoint sovereignty. The bigger question is what will the ripple effect be? Could talks to create a similar South American zone will lose ground, as well as packs for Asian alliances?

    Perhaps the largest threat is the realization from European leader countries (Germany, Ireland, And France), that the value gained from the EU may have been more superficial. This looking glass moment for the world may offer a case study for further departure from singular zones. Or just the opposite could ensue as countries band together.

  • David Rodeck
    David RodeckDirector of Content at Invested Media

    Still no answer, especially for what to do with Ireland. In the end, maybe Scotland and North Ireland end up splitting off the UK since they mainly voted remain.

    Brexit voters were hoping to rekindle the Empire, they may have lost the last few parts of the United Kingdom.

  • William Wood
    William WoodOwner at William Wood

    I do not know what the world was expecting, but you had an anti Brexit Prime Minister, in charge, of Brexit Negotiations. A formula for failure. I do not think Parliament will approve, and chaos will follow. Don’t expect any help from Brussels, they just want their pound of flesh (Currency). The People of Britain spoke, and now the globalists want it their way. Say goodbye Prime Minister, hello mass confusion!

  • Danielle Golds
    Danielle GoldsAnalyst at Quartz

    Sometimes I wish more U.S. politicians would resign because they cannot do things “in good conscience.” Although Raab is probably just quitting so he can run for leadership later, at least he’s sticking behind what he actually believes in.

  • Yuni Wakamatu
    Yuni Wakamatu

    Between hard and rock.

  • Phil Ahern
    Phil AhernDirector and co founder.

    The hardline brexit fantasies about what could be achieved from any deal have finally come to pass yet still they bang out the same rhetoric. Unbelievable denial. Let’s hope there is a people’s vote and that the country reaches a rational conclusion!

  • You can’t have your cake as eat it.

  • James Sowders
    James Sowders

    Fear independence ....drama........drama

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