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More Restaurants and Cafés Refuse to Accept Cash — That’s Not a Good Thing

More Restaurants and Cafés Refuse to Accept Cash — That’s Not a Good Thing

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Contributions

  • While I prefer plastic and can certainly see the logistical upside for a small business to refuse cash, cash is what it comes down to for underbanked people and those coming through the years after bankruptcy. It seems discriminatory and harsh to exclude that demographic altogether.

  • This article makes some valid points - everyone can access cash, not everyone can access a card. What percentage of Americans don't have a credit card? Or potentially even a bank account? While it may not be discriminatory, I worry it could potentially set a standard putting many at a disadvantage.

  • I get the point this article is making, but isn’t the inverse situation equally true: cash-only discrimination? I can’t count the amount of times I’ve wanted to purchase food from a street vendor only to be told, “sorry, we only accept cash”. And, like many folks my age, we tend not to carry cash.

    I get the point this article is making, but isn’t the inverse situation equally true: cash-only discrimination? I can’t count the amount of times I’ve wanted to purchase food from a street vendor only to be told, “sorry, we only accept cash”. And, like many folks my age, we tend not to carry cash.

    It’ll be interesting to see how consumer purchasing decisions shift within a cashless society and the effect, if any, it will have on cash-only vendors (cannabis dispensaries not included).

  • A bigger piece here is how the rest of the world is far more advanced than the USA when it comes to payments. When we FINALLY accepted chip and pin technology, the ROW took on contactless payments. They're far ahead when it comes to secure transactions and pushing cash only establishments forward because

    A bigger piece here is how the rest of the world is far more advanced than the USA when it comes to payments. When we FINALLY accepted chip and pin technology, the ROW took on contactless payments. They're far ahead when it comes to secure transactions and pushing cash only establishments forward because of the actual seamless benefits from loyalty to convenience.

    It's still so frustrating to me on how many places are still cash only and will continue to be stubborn behind it.

  • I’m old enough to remember when many stores refused to take credit/debit cards as payment. Back then, the argument was that cards equate legal tender and therefore must be accepted as payment. Now that the situation has flipped and cash is on the outs, I can’t see how anyone would argue that cash isn’t

    I’m old enough to remember when many stores refused to take credit/debit cards as payment. Back then, the argument was that cards equate legal tender and therefore must be accepted as payment. Now that the situation has flipped and cash is on the outs, I can’t see how anyone would argue that cash isn’t legal tender and can be declined as a payment option.

  • I agree with some of the other comments people have left about this article. “Cashless” transactions leave a certain percentage of people out in the cold, particularly the people with bad credit, the poor, and the homeless. We already discriminate against these groups unfairly and it seems to me this

    I agree with some of the other comments people have left about this article. “Cashless” transactions leave a certain percentage of people out in the cold, particularly the people with bad credit, the poor, and the homeless. We already discriminate against these groups unfairly and it seems to me this is one more example of that.

    I love using my Apple Watch for contactless payment, but I also want the cash in my wallet to as easily accepted. I may have personal reasons for wanting to pay with cash.

    If I’m not mistaken there was a time when accepting currency was the law of the land. I admit that currency exchange and economics in general are not my strong suit.

    I was born, grew up, and still live in Silicon Valley. My partner is a computer engineer and high-tech patent attorney. We both like good tech and we’re early adopters of new technology. Maybe I’m “old fashioned,” (or just old,) but this is one advance that I don’t feel comfortable about.

  • I’m surprised that restaurants don’t prefer cash

    Many years ago they certainly did.With cash they could avoid disclosing some income.

  • Cash is the number one currency for tax evasion. Credit/debit is the number one currency for convenience.

    The future is cashless.

  • There is no question that cashless restaurants are superior with regard to bookkeeping, theft/shrink, and controls. But what about equity?

  • Refusing cash payments creates a ‘paper trail’ for the IRS. It also defeats ‘skimming’ - a long held benefit to the owners of such establishments. So...depending on which ox is being gored, this policy can be seen as both good and bad.

  • I’m old school and like to avoid having my life tracked as much as possible... Big brother can watch those cashless transactions. And, those cashless transactions are also salable to others. Plus, what happens when cashless systems get hacked or go offline? Not a good path to follow, in my humble opinion.

  • On one hand you’d think business owners would prefer cash to avoid credit card fees. But it’s likely influenced by employees stealing from the till. At large venues they manage count of plastic cups to detect employee theft. Maybe also the risk of losses due to robbery.

  • I don’t think cash should be eliminated, but at the same token I don’t think businesses should be cash only. Perhaps there could be a better methodology to tender cash as effectively as card-based and digital transactions?

  • It seems a great way to separate the "haves" from the "have nots" . Soon, only shabby people will use cah! Also, Visa is likely encouraging ownrs to go cashless since they make money from every transaction the purveyors make, the customers, and from the rentals of the machines they must use. Never mind

    It seems a great way to separate the "haves" from the "have nots" . Soon, only shabby people will use cah! Also, Visa is likely encouraging ownrs to go cashless since they make money from every transaction the purveyors make, the customers, and from the rentals of the machines they must use. Never mind plenty of data to sell!

  • I really hate this concept. We frequently eat out & pay with cash. Eating out is discretionary for us & we limit our cash w/d every month so if we run out of cash, we cut back on dining out. I also don't like to charge small amounts, prefering to pay cash. If I want ice cream & can't pay cash, I'll go

    I really hate this concept. We frequently eat out & pay with cash. Eating out is discretionary for us & we limit our cash w/d every month so if we run out of cash, we cut back on dining out. I also don't like to charge small amounts, prefering to pay cash. If I want ice cream & can't pay cash, I'll go where I can pay cash or do without. It's easier to monitor my spending with cash.

  • So sad to have economic discrimination on top of everything else.

  • The exact same thing is happening in Australia, too. I'd suggest, as with so many things out here, we've copied from America