Skip to navigationSkip to content
Lorenzo Gritti

Good afternoon.

Canopy branches out

The future of finance

Solving the climate crisis

The way we colonize Mars says a lot about how we address climate change. Is repeating our mistakes on another planet the answer to our existential crises?

The problems we’re solving for on Earth will only follow us to Mars

The most important sentence in this article for me is: “Imagine all the things we could do on Earth if we allocated an extra $22.6 billion to addressing climate change on our own planet?”.

Space exploration has undoubtedly kickstarted a raft of technological innovations we’ve all benefited from (insulin

The most important sentence in this article for me is: “Imagine all the things we could do on Earth if we allocated an extra $22.6 billion to addressing climate change on our own planet?”.

Space exploration has undoubtedly kickstarted a raft of technological innovations we’ve all benefited from (insulin pumps, solar cells, artificial limbs to name a few). So in my mind, it’s only worth spending all this money on getting to and living on Mars, if in doing so, we develop technology that also helps us solve all our very real problems here on Earth.

Get smart about parenting

Raising a child is hard. But the “parenting is hard” trope, which feeds memes and dinner conversations, can be dangerous. It frames the problem as the individual failure of a single parent rather than as a social issue.

The hardest part of being a parent has nothing to do with raising kids

I always say we have to raise our girls to be brave, not perfect. But it's not enough for parents to try to do this work alone, we have to change as a society because our kids are getting messages from everywhere - media, school, classmates - so it's on all of us together.

A world in the streets

How Gen Z is changing Tinder

Wheels up

Disrupting dementia

Next-generation dementia care could learn from cancer care. Palliative care helps patients in their final months, and is often used for people suffering from end-stage cancer. But it can actually help anyone who has a long-term, chronic illness, and it could be especially effective for people living with dementia. ✦

Next-generation dementia care could learn a lesson from cancer care

In the 1950s, a single British physician named Cicely Saunders championed a new kind of care for terminally-ill cancer patients. She found that relieving pain and suffering made them happier—and ironically, live longer, even if drugs couldn't actually treat their condition.

That was the birth of hospice

In the 1950s, a single British physician named Cicely Saunders championed a new kind of care for terminally-ill cancer patients. She found that relieving pain and suffering made them happier—and ironically, live longer, even if drugs couldn't actually treat their condition.

That was the birth of hospice, which is a form of palliative care for the last six months of a person's life. Hospice, however, is a form of palliative care, which in general just means person-centered care. Sometimes, this means using life-saving interventions, like antibiotics for an infection. Other times, it means just making sue the person is comfortable. It depends on what the person and their caregivers want.

Palliative care could save dementia care, which is the more expensive in the last five years of life than cancer and heart disease. It could also save health care in general; it's cheaper than the current care systems in place. The trouble is, because it was historically used for cancer treatment, that's how most doctors think of it. Luckily, a few hospitals are testing out palliative care. If their results are good, it could expand nation-wide.

The rising price of immigration

The sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE. There is only one carrier willing to take on US deportation flights and they're charging the US government nearly double the normal price, making flights as expensive as $33,500 per hour in November.

Sole airline willing to deport high-risk immigrants is price-gouging ICE

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to

A basic lesson in supply and demand, as seen through the lens of ICE Air ops in an unredacted ICE document we obtained. ICE can only obtain the Boeing 767s required for its so-called SHRC (special high-risk charter) flights from one company in the entire country, because it's the only firm willing to take the contract for fear of negative press. But last month, those 767s were tied up with other, richer customers (i.e. the Dept. of Defense). So ICE was forced to take whatever the carrier offered—a 777 that was a couple of hundred seats bigger than what ICE needed, and double the price: $33,000/flight hr vs $17,000/flight hr. The company knows it's the only game in town and has no incentive to meet ICE halfway, according to ICE's primary charter broker, explaining why it can't put any pressure on the subcontractor to come down on its rate.

Every now and then, my faith is restored that the markets really know how to do their job. I'll use this as a lesson tonight to teach my kid the basics about supply and demand, and about how actions have consequences.

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge

This is a super illuminating piece that shows the complexity of immigration control, public protest, and the business of deportation. Because ICE has garnered so much criticism few companies want to risk a public backlash and run the agency's charters. In fact, only one does it, which means it can charge whatever it wants.

Justin shows here how much this lack of competition is costing US taxpayers. It doesn't mean we should support all of ICE's activities but it does expose a dark side to an already dark law enforcement project.

The most wonderful time of the year?

The real life Irishman

Roll credits 🎬

Close
Do You Even Bake, Bro?

Do You Even Bake, Bro?

Read more on Eater

Contributions

  • Perhaps bread will follow the wine curve: a snooty shift from art to science, resulting in high priced, commoditized perfection, followed by a snooty shift back to art and the nuances of even higher priced imperfection.

  • For engineers and scientists who live in an exacting world, naturally fermented bread is wonderfully freeing. It is unpredictable—I bake mine weekly with Lahey’s method and it never tastes the same way twice. I get the appeal if not the geekiness.

  • I’m surprised that concepts like “blockchain” or “cryptobread” aren’t in this article.

  • Goodbye grandma's old recipe journal, say hello to the Tech Bro sourdough spreadsheet.

    A great deep dive into the Silicon Valley techies who are bringing the data and analysis from their start up jobs into the kitchen.

  • Leave it to Silicon Valley to take the fun out of carbs!

  • Growing up in a baking family (shameless plug for Bread Alone Bakery for those in NYC), these trends have been coming for a long time.

    Nonetheless, it is exciting to see so much technology in an ancient craft. Though it is always interesting to see the seeming odd trend of technological advancement

    Growing up in a baking family (shameless plug for Bread Alone Bakery for those in NYC), these trends have been coming for a long time.

    Nonetheless, it is exciting to see so much technology in an ancient craft. Though it is always interesting to see the seeming odd trend of technological advancement leading to a return to near-biblical practices of farming and baking of late.

  • Sometimes there’s too much science. And, I’m an engineer who should love that aspect.

  • “These tech bros, who often unknowingly operate in closed-loop communities where men elevate men (a phenomenon that is in no way limited to the tech industry), were able to insert themselves, through an outward posturing as experts, into the dominant narrative of the bread world.”

    Sourdough buffs know

    “These tech bros, who often unknowingly operate in closed-loop communities where men elevate men (a phenomenon that is in no way limited to the tech industry), were able to insert themselves, through an outward posturing as experts, into the dominant narrative of the bread world.”

    Sourdough buffs know it was a woman, Nancy Silverton of La Brea Bakery in L.A. who reopened American eyes to artisanal bread in the late 80s and 90s.

    On the one hand, I'm happy craft is being elevated by anybody. On the other hand, how odd it is the moneyed can so easily be seen as "experts" to the detriment of others. I guess, acknowledging the phenomenon from the above quote is the first step to awareness...

  • Almost ever week without fail someone at the [tech] company I work at will bring in a loaf of sourdough they baked over the weekend. I never really noticed until now but it’s always a man, usually a data scientist or engineer. Very good article that gives a interesting perspective to the “new” popularity in baking bread.

  • Be warned. You could make and bake a loaf in the time it will take to read this.

  • I’ll stick to my boring whole wheat loafs that I throw together in 5 minutes.

  • Regardless of bread being the new techie addiction, any inquisitive attention towards food transparency will be positive in the grand scheme of nutritional habit change. The more REAL food consumed the better.

  • Sourdough Bread!